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Abstract

Raghavan and Hurley explore the hauntings of imposterism as they manifest in and through a complex interplay of private-professional-intimate and embodied experiences. Through the use of two vignettes and grounded in a discussion of Black, Decolonial and Queer feminisms, the chapter draws specific attention to the complexities arising from, and the deeply personal tensions involved in, navigating positions of privilege, marginality, and besiegement as they relate to gender, race, sexuality, caste, and class. In doing so, they provide a nuanced, collaborative reflection on authenticity, conformity, and resistance in a neoliberal academy that fetishizes and commodifies otherness in problematic, exploitative ways.

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Notes

  1. 1.

    See Leela Fernandes (2003) for an account of Active Witnessing which she sees as a practice of accountability, resistance, and action rather than a rote process of observation and documentation.

  2. 2.

    See Linda Tuhiwai-Smith, Thenmozhi Soundarajan, Jennifer Nash, Audre Lorde, Patricia Hill-Collins among others.

  3. 3.

    See Audre Lorde, bell hooks, Jennifer Nash, Gloria Anzaldua, Anjana Raghavan, and Lata Mani for more in-depth work on Black and WoC theorisations of love.

  4. 4.

    See: Syed Farid Alatas 2000, Gurminder Bhambra 2013, 2014, and 2016, Julian Go 2016 for work on the coloniality of Sociology as a discipline. For examples of similar work in International Relations see: Geeta and Nair (2013), Biswas and Nair (2009), Biswas (2014).

  5. 5.

    Caste position of enormous structural privilege as well as symbolic-ritual power in the Indian caste system. It occupies the ‘top’ tier of the Indian caste hierarchy, where each caste tier considers itself ‘superior’ to the one ‘below’ it.

  6. 6.

    An embodied, personal-political imagining of theory that Anzaldua uses in her own work.

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Raghavan, A., Hurley, M. (2022). Haunting Imposterism. In: Addison, M., Breeze, M., Taylor, Y. (eds) The Palgrave Handbook of Imposter Syndrome in Higher Education. Palgrave Macmillan, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-86570-2_36

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-86570-2_36

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