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Communication with Women in the Menopause Transition

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Each Woman’s Menopause: An Evidence Based Resource

Abstract

Although menopause is an experience that all women share, each woman’s experience is uniquely her own. This chapter explores communication with women in the menopause transition through the lens of cultural humility by gaining insight into the woman’s lived experience and facilitating information exchange. Utilizing patient-centered communication, healthcare providers can establish a trusting relationship, create an open dialogue, and engage in shared decision-making about the flexible menopause transition management plan.

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Correspondence to Juliette G. Blount .

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Blount, J.G. (2022). Communication with Women in the Menopause Transition. In: Geraghty, P. (eds) Each Woman’s Menopause: An Evidence Based Resource. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-85484-3_3

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-85484-3_3

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