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Information Visualization

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Abstract

This chapter aims to build a theoretical framework for information visualization with a particular focus on libraries. It exhibits and explains fundamental graphs, advanced graphs, and text and document visualizations in detail. It enumerates various rules on visual design and use cases from libraries to understand information visualization concepts and how they can be applied in libraries comprehensively. A case study showing how to build a dashboard in R language is also included. This chapter is helpful for information professionals who (i) are new to the concept of information visualization, (ii) want to know more about information visualization, or (iii) want to visualize their data.

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  • DOI: 10.1007/978-3-030-85085-2_9
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Lamba, M., Madhusudhan, M. (2022). Information Visualization. In: Text Mining for Information Professionals. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-85085-2_9

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-85085-2_9

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  • Publisher Name: Springer, Cham

  • Print ISBN: 978-3-030-85084-5

  • Online ISBN: 978-3-030-85085-2

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