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Using New Technologies in Quality of Life Assessment

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Abstract

The use of word ‘patient’ has evolved over time and now it encompasses both the person seeking health services and his/her social network including family, friends, and community. Both in research and in clinical care, involvement of patients as a partner has increased, suggesting collaborative approach to patient care. There are several ways in which data is obtained patients and his/her interaction with the others and health services. Various technologies are currently used to capture patient-reported outcomes, in particular the use of social media platforms has gained popularity as a source of information that is important to the patient.

Keywords

  • Health-related quality of life
  • Patient-reported outcomes
  • Technology
  • Social media

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Correspondence to Kedar K. V. Mate .

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Mate, K.K.V. (2022). Using New Technologies in Quality of Life Assessment. In: Kassianos, A.P. (eds) Handbook of Quality of Life in Cancer. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-84702-9_8

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-84702-9_8

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