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The Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy (FACIT) Measurement System: Guidance for Use in Research and Clinical Practice

Abstract

Since 1988, the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy (FACIT) Measurement System has evolved from a cancer-specific measure of health-related quality of life in breast, lung, and colon cancer, to include multiple cancer site-specific subscales and measures designed for several other chronic conditions, disease symptoms, treatment side effects, and patient-centered outcomes. There are now more than 700 items comprising more than 100 measures, some of which are assessed in over 70 languages. Patient-centeredness has always been at the heart of its development, emphasizing two fundamental principles of life quality: subjectivity and multidimensionality. Published data on reference groups (cancer and general population) for many of the scales allow a basis for score interpretation, and an expanding body of evidence supports values for meaningful differences and change, at individual and group levels. An item library now allows users to customize assessment and build survey forms for specific applications in research and clinical practice, adjusting to the rapidly evolving therapeutic landscape in oncology and other chronic diseases.

Keywords

  • Cancer
  • Patient-reported outcomes
  • Health-related quality of life
  • FACIT Measurement System
  • Responder definition
  • Important differences/important change

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Webster, K.A., Peipert, J.D., Lent, L.F., Bredle, J., Cella, D. (2022). The Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy (FACIT) Measurement System: Guidance for Use in Research and Clinical Practice. In: Kassianos, A.P. (eds) Handbook of Quality of Life in Cancer. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-84702-9_6

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