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Cross-Cultural Considerations in Health-Related Quality of Life in Cancer

Abstract

With the world becoming a global village, it is imperative for healthcare providers (HCPs) to provide patient-centered care in a culturally competent way to improve patient’s health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Cancer care is no exception, with HCPs having to navigate through difficult topics of breaking the diagnosis, treatment options, pain management, and at times end-of-life care, not just with the patient but with their family as well.

The perception of HRQOL in cancer patients can vary across different cultures. It is, therefore, vital to have research instruments that cater to the diverse patient population. Developing new culture-specific questionnaires or adaptation of existing survey instruments are different approaches that can be utilized. The process of translation and achieving cultural equivalence poses significant challenges, particularly in the absence of having standardized methodologies.

This chapter highlights the influence of socio-cultural factors on the perceptions of cancer patients regarding their HRQOL. It will also highlight the challenges both HCPs and researchers face while encountering cancer patients belonging to different cultural backgrounds. In addition, it will also suggest ways to inculcate a culturally competent approach to providing healthcare and conducting research for such patients and their families.

Keywords

  • Health-related quality of life
  • Cross-cultural adaptation
  • Cultural competence
  • Cancer
  • Translation
  • Patient-reported outcomes
  • Palliative care

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Fig. 12.1

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Ladak, L.A., Raza, S.F., Khawaja, S. (2022). Cross-Cultural Considerations in Health-Related Quality of Life in Cancer. In: Kassianos, A.P. (eds) Handbook of Quality of Life in Cancer. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-84702-9_12

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