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Abstract

Drama and science are often considered as pedagogical binaries; one concerned with rationality and the other affect. This chapter will explore the notion of mutuality and the inter-relationships between the two disciplines. Neither discipline in service of the other, but one enriching the other. This positions the two disciplines as mutual and symbiotic. Demonstrated in this chapter is a theoretical approach to interdisciplinary unit design that draws on an understanding of the mutuality of the two disciplines, using the Mantle of the expert and 5Es inquiry model. The unit titled ‘Inter-relationships in Our World’ brings together the content from Australian Curriculum Assessment and Reporting Authority (ACARA) at Year 9 in both drama and science.

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Correspondence to Tricia Clark-Fookes .

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Clark-Fookes, T., Henderson, S. (2021). Mutuality and Inter-relativity of Drama and Science. In: White, P.J., Raphael, J., van Cuylenburg, K. (eds) Science and Drama: Contemporary and Creative Approaches to Teaching and Learning. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-84401-1_2

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-84401-1_2

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