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Gender, Toys, and Play: How Gendered Early Experiences Shape Later Development

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Gender and Sexuality Development

Part of the book series: Focus on Sexuality Research ((FOSR))

Abstract

Gender differences in children’s play behaviors are large and consistent across the psychological literature. These play behaviors include children’s toy interests, play styles, and peer preferences during play. Contemporary research has investigated the biological, social, and cognitive influences on children’s gender-typed toy play including the role of prenatal androgens, parental and peer socialization, gender cognitions, and gender stereotypes. Contemporary research also suggests that children’s gender-typed play behaviors may lead to gender differentiation throughout development. Specifically, the large differences in boys’ and girls’ play behaviors may lead to gender differences in children’s physical, social, and cognitive development. Theoretical implications are discussed as well as limitations of the current literature that necessitate future research.

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Weisgram, E.S. (2022). Gender, Toys, and Play: How Gendered Early Experiences Shape Later Development. In: VanderLaan, D.P., Wong, W.I. (eds) Gender and Sexuality Development. Focus on Sexuality Research. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-84273-4_7

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