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The Challenges of Incorporating Elders into Schools

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Part of the Critical Studies of Education book series (CSOE,volume 16)

Abstract

Like all other forms of resistance to colonial domination and hegemony, the integration of Indigenous Elders and their cultural knowledges into schools is not without challenges. Integration does not take place on neutral ground as the school is a contested colonial landscape peppered with colonizing ideologies that are often hostile to Indigenous Elders. Colonial formations and logics are fundamentally opposed to decolonizing approaches intrinsic to Indigenous resurgence and decolonization ideologies and practices, including efforts to Indigenize schools and schooling. The incorporation of Indigenous knowledges in schools requires de-centering colonial foundations of education and theories of knowledge production, power and privilege embedded in contemporary educational structures, as well as grappling with questions of complicity and Eurocentric seduction. Despite these challenges, Indigenous communities continue to challenge and resist colonial education and to insist on the right of their children to be educated in their own languages and within their own cultures.

Keywords

  • Colonizing ideologies
  • Culturally relevant learning
  • Knowledge synthesis
  • Eurocentric privileges
  • Epistemic equity
  • Multiplicity of worldviews
  • Knowledge integration
  • Knowledge hierarchies and erasures
  • Neo-liberal internationalization
  • Globalization
  • Complicity
  • Power and privilege
  • Cultural imperialism
  • Hijacking decolonizing theories

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Correspondence to George J. Sefa Dei .

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Dei, G.J.S., Karanja, W., Erger, G. (2022). The Challenges of Incorporating Elders into Schools. In: Elders’ Cultural Knowledges and the Question of Black/ African Indigeneity in Education. Critical Studies of Education, vol 16. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-84201-7_9

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-84201-7_9

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