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Responding to the Epistemic Challenge – A Decolonial Project

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Part of the Critical Studies of Education book series (CSOE,volume 16)

Abstract

The integration of Elders’ cultural knowledges in schools is anchored in anti-colonial and decolonial frames of reference as a counter-hegemonic subversive, oppositional, and resistant endeavor to reclaim Indigenous knowledges and ways of learning from the colonial stranglehold for the benefit of the black/Latinx and Indigenous learners who have historically been marginalized by Western colonial structures of education. Decoloniality and anti-colonial prisms act as strategic intellectual and political frames of reference for counter-visioning Western education and call into question, the dominant narrative of Western modernity. As well, it insists on the centrality of Indigenous epistemologies, spiritualities and spiritual ontologies and literacies in thinking through theory of knowledge and knowledge production to unsettle colonial structures, systems, and dynamics of education. It privileges the of interplay of Land and Indigenous knowledge production, to reclaim and center Indigenous ways of learning in schools.

Keywords

  • Integration
  • Cultural knowledges
  • Elders
  • Anti-colonial
  • Decolonial
  • Racialized
  • Cultural knowledges
  • African elders’ cultural knowledges
  • ‘Indigene,’ social action
  • Spirituality and spiritual ontologies
  • Dispossessing
  • Indigenous peoples
  • Land
  • Global knowledge production
  • Indigeneity

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Correspondence to George J. Sefa Dei .

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Dei, G.J.S., Karanja, W., Erger, G. (2022). Responding to the Epistemic Challenge – A Decolonial Project. In: Elders’ Cultural Knowledges and the Question of Black/ African Indigeneity in Education. Critical Studies of Education, vol 16. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-84201-7_4

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