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Conclusion: Imagining New Indigenous Educational Futurities

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Part of the Critical Studies of Education book series (CSOE,volume 16)

Abstract

This book has attempted to highlight the historical origins of colonial education in Canada and interrogate the contemporary delivery of education in how it impacts the educational outcomes of Black, Indigenous, Latinx, and other racialized learners. We have also attempted to illuminate the role of Indigenous cultural knowledges in schools and how such knowledges can be beneficial in closing the educational gap experienced by non-dominant Black, Indigenous, Latinx and other racialized learners. We have provided local and international best practices where Indigenous Elders’ cultural knowledges are transforming and decolonizing formal colonial education through Indigenization approaches. These approaches offer possibilities for engaging Elders and their cultural knowledges in schools.

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Correspondence to George J. Sefa Dei .

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Dei, G.J.S., Karanja, W., Erger, G. (2022). Conclusion: Imagining New Indigenous Educational Futurities. In: Elders’ Cultural Knowledges and the Question of Black/ African Indigeneity in Education. Critical Studies of Education, vol 16. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-84201-7_10

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-84201-7_10

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