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Analytical Phase: Principles for Immunohistochemistry (IHC)

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Abstract

The major steps of the Analytic Phase will be described for IHC specifically, but in most cases the principles apply equally to ISH and IF methods that will be discussed in Chap. 14.

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Jasani, B., Huss, R., Taylor, C.R. (2021). Analytical Phase: Principles for Immunohistochemistry (IHC). In: Precision Cancer Medicine. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-84087-7_9

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-84087-7_9

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  • Publisher Name: Springer, Cham

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