Skip to main content

Access is Love: Equity-Minded Pandemic Pedagogy

Part of the Political Pedagogies book series (PP)

Abstract

Barriers to access in higher education are most often understood in the context of disability, and the accommodations disabled students are legally guaranteed. This chapter highlights the ways barriers to access exist for all students, not just those whose access needs arise from disability status. Informed by Disability Studies theory, and my experiences in the classroom, I discuss how instructors can practice care in the classroom through an orientation to access which is not limited to disability. In urging readers to expand their conceptions of what “access” is, I argue access, and barriers to it, must be a foundational consideration in designing and teaching IR courses moving forward. The slogan “Access Is Love” comes from a project of the same name, created and led by three disabled Asian-American women: Mia Mingus, Sandy Ho, and Alice Wong.

This is a preview of subscription content, log in via an institution.

Buying options

Chapter
USD   29.95
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • Available as PDF
  • Read on any device
  • Instant download
  • Own it forever
eBook
USD   99.00
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • Available as EPUB and PDF
  • Read on any device
  • Instant download
  • Own it forever
Softcover Book
USD   129.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • Compact, lightweight edition
  • Dispatched in 3 to 5 business days
  • Free shipping worldwide - see info
Hardcover Book
USD   129.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • Durable hardcover edition
  • Dispatched in 3 to 5 business days
  • Free shipping worldwide - see info

Tax calculation will be finalised at checkout

Purchases are for personal use only

Learn about institutional subscriptions

Notes

  1. 1.

    I use person-first language (PFL) of “people/person with a disability” and identity-first language (IFL) of “disabled person/people” interchangeably in this chapter. The term “person/people with a disability” is most commonly used in the United States to discuss disability in 2021, and it ostensibly serves to separate the person from their disability, thus not allowing a person to be defined by their disability (Snow, 2007). The term “disabled person/people” is an example of IFL in which people commonly identify with a social identity of disabled, like woman or Black person (Ladau 2015). PFL has become commonly used in documents and conventions of international organizations like the UN, where language used to proclaim 1981 the International Year of Disabled Persons, has been ditched in favor of PFL, in documents like the 2006 UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UCNRPD). This is not an apolitical (Titchkosky, 2001) nor unimportant change in official language around disability which occurred in both the United States where the Rehabilitation Act Amendments of 1986 changed the Rehabilitation Act of 1973’s language from “handicapped individual” to “individual with a handicap.” The debate over IFL/PFL, especially as it pertains to the disabled social and political identity is ongoing and an important site for political analysis but is a distinction I do not seek to take a proverbial side of here.

References

  • Altbach, P. G., Lomotey, K., & Rivers, S. (2002). Race in higher education. The racial crisis in American higher education: Continuing challenges for the twenty-first century, 23–41.

    Google Scholar 

  • Ardoin, S. (2019). Straddling class in the academy: 26 stories of students, administrators, and faculty from poor and working-class backgrounds and their compelling lessons for higher education policy and practice. Stylus Publishing, LLC.

    Google Scholar 

  • Arman, S. (2019). Strategies for fostering inclusive classrooms in higher education: International perspectives on equity and inclusion. Emerald Publishing Limited.

    Google Scholar 

  • Blessinger, P., O’Callaghan, P., Cobb, L. N., Galvez, D., Gonzalez, C., Graber, J., Gruberg, S. J., Hall, M. P., & Hoffman, J. (2018). Perspectives on diverse student identities in higher education: International perspectives on equity and inclusion. Emerald Publishing Limited.

    Google Scholar 

  • Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2020, August 10). Labor force participation rate 20.8 percent for people with a disability in 2019. TED: The Economics Daily. https://www.bls.gov/opub/ted/2020/labor-force-participation-rate-20-point-8-percent-for-people-with-a-disability-during-2019.htm

  • Campbell, F. (2009). Contours of ableism: The production of disability and abledness. Palgrave Macmillan.

    Google Scholar 

  • Catherine, J. (2018). Intersections of disability justice racial justice and environmental justice. Environmental Sociology, 4(1), 122–135. https://doi.org/10.1080/23251042.2018.1424497

  • Disability & Intersectionality Summit. (2021). Access is love. Disummit. https://www.disabilityintersectionalitysummit.com/about

  • Dolmage, J. T. (2017). Academic ableism: Disability and higher education. University of Michigan Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Fain, P. (2020, June 17). The pandemic has worsened equity gaps in higher education and work. Inside HigherEd. https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2020/06/17/pandemic-has-worsened-equity-gaps-higher-education-and-work

  • Goldrick-Rab, S., Coca, V., Kienzl, G., Welton, C. R., Dahl, S., & Magnelia, S. (2020). #RealCollege during the pandemic: New evidence on basic needs insecurity and student well-being. Hope4College.com.

    Google Scholar 

  • Griful-Freixenet, J., Struyven, K., Verstichele, M., & Andries, C. (2017). Higher education students with disabilities speaking out: Perceived barriers and opportunities of the Universal Design for Learning framework. Disability & Society, 32(10), 1627–1649.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Hamraie, A. (2017). Building access: Universal design and the politics of disability. University of Minnesota Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Harper, S. R., Patton, L. D., & Wooden, O. S. (2009). Access and equity for African American students in higher education: A critical race historical analysis of policy efforts. The Journal of Higher Education, 80(4), 389–414.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Jampel, C. (2018). Intersections of disability justice, racial justice and environmental justice. Environmental Sociology, 4(1), 122–135.

    Google Scholar 

  • Jenks, A. (Forthcoming). I have to make my classroom accessible: Digital practice and PBL as inclusive pedagogy. In K. Armstrong, L. Genova, J. W. Greenlee, & D. Samuel (Eds.), Teaching gradually: Practical pedagogy for graduate students, By Graduate Students. Stylus Publishing, LLC.

    Google Scholar 

  • Jenks, A. B., & Obringer, K. M. (2020). The poverty of plastics bans: Environmentalism’s win is a loss for disabled people. Critical Social Policy, 40(1), 151–161.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Jenks, E. B. (2005). Explaining disability: Parents’ stories of raising children with visual impairments in a sighted world. Journal of Contemporary Ethnography, 34(2), 143–169. https://doi.org/10.1177/0891241604272064

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Ladau, E. (2015, July 20). Why person-first lnaguage doesn’t always put the person first [Blog]. Think Inclusive. https://www.thinkinclusive.us/why-person-first-language-doesnt-always-put-the-person-first/

  • Maloney, E. J., & Kim, J. (2020, May 21). The challenge of equity in higher education under COVID-19. Inside HigherED. https://www.insidehighered.com/blogs/learning-innovation/challenge-equity-higher-education-under-covid-19

  • Meyer, A., Rose, D. H., & Gordon, D. T. (2014). Universal design for learning: Theory and practice. CAST Professional Publishing.

    Google Scholar 

  • Morley, L. (2020). Does class still matter? Conversations about power, privilege and persistent inequalities in higher education. Discourse: Studies in the Cultural Politics of Education, 1–12.

    Google Scholar 

  • Myers, K. A., Lindburg, J. J., & Nied, D. M. (2014). Allies for inclusion: Disability and equity in higher education: ASHE, 39(5). John Wiley & Sons.

    Google Scholar 

  • Oliver, M. (1983). Social work with disabled people. The Macmillan Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Orfield, G., Marin, P., & Horn, C. L. (2005). Higher education and the color line: College access, racial equity, and social change. ERIC.

    Google Scholar 

  • Snow, K. (2007). People first language. Including Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities, 3(4), 1–9.

    Google Scholar 

  • Straumsheim, C. (2017, March 7). How one instructor is pursuing accessibility in online education. Inside HigherEd. https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2017/03/07/how-one-instructor-pursuing-accessibility-online-education

  • Titchkosky, T. (2001). Disability: A rose by any other name? “People-first” language in Canadian society. Canadian Review of Sociology/revue Canadienne De Sociologie, 38(2), 125–140. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1755-618X.2001.tb00967.x

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Titchkosky, T. (2011). The question of access: Disability, space, meaning. University of Toronto Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Turmusani, M. (2003). Disabled people and economic needs in the developing world: A political perspective from Jordan. Ashgate.

    Google Scholar 

  • Yosso, T. J., Parker, L., Solorzano, D. G., & Lynn, M. (2004). Chapter 1: From Jim Crow to affirmative action and back again: A critical race discussion of racialized rationales and access to higher education. Review of Research in Education, 28(1), 1–25.

    Google Scholar 

Download references

Author information

Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Editor information

Editors and Affiliations

Rights and permissions

Reprints and permissions

Copyright information

© 2022 The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Switzerland AG

About this chapter

Check for updates. Verify currency and authenticity via CrossMark

Cite this chapter

Jenks, A.B. (2022). Access is Love: Equity-Minded Pandemic Pedagogy. In: Szarejko, A.A. (eds) Pandemic Pedagogy. Political Pedagogies. Palgrave Macmillan, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-83557-6_9

Download citation

Publish with us

Policies and ethics