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Indigenous Mobilities in Diaspora. Literacies of Spatial Tense

Abstract

In this chapter we discuss how literacies are mediated and embodied by two groups of migrants affiliated with American public schools, a group of Indigenous Maya parents at an elementary school and a group of Pacific Islander students at a high school. In both cases we examine the discursive processes whereby these two groups create and engage literacies, which we term ‘literacies of spatial tense’ (extending Elizabeth Povinelli’s notion of social tense), to both read and occupy graded locations that are beyond the ‘here’ and ‘there,’ often in projection of other(ed) spaces of belonging.

Keywords

  • Indigenous Maya immigrants
  • Decolonial literacies
  • Pacific Islander epistemologies
  • Literacy and spatiality

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Fig. 2.1

(Photo credit Patricia Baquedano-López)

Fig. 2.2

(Photo credit Patricia Baquedano-López)

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Acknowledgements and Commitments

We acknowledge that we work and live in the unceded lands of the Xučyun and the Chochenyo speaking Ohlone people. In our work we strive to affirm Indigenous sovereignty and knowledge. We thank the students, teachers, and families with whom we work in our projects, as well as the student researchers and assistants of the Laboratory for the Study of Interaction and Discourse in Educational Research (L-Sider) at the University of California, Berkeley.

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Correspondence to Patricia Baquedano-López .

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Baquedano-López, P., Gong, N. (2022). Indigenous Mobilities in Diaspora. Literacies of Spatial Tense. In: Norlund Shaswar, A., Rosén, J. (eds) Literacies in the Age of Mobility. Palgrave Macmillan, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-83317-6_2

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-83317-6_2

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