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Ethnic Minority and Indigenous Higher Education in the Globalization: Neoliberal Challenges and Opportunities for Policies and Institutions

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Part of the Globalisation, Comparative Education and Policy Research book series (GCEP,volume 27)

Abstract

The neoliberal dimensions of globalization have significantly impacted the development of global higher education through a predominantly market-driven focus. In this context, ethnic minority and indigenous higher education in many countries face both challenges and opportunities for their dual missions of offering higher education and preserving ethnic and indigenous cultures, languages, and identities. This chapter analyses the impact of neoliberalism on ethnic minority and indigenous higher education policies and institutions in three countries, China, Canada, and the United States, and from the perspectives of three development models, which represent a centralized model in China, a decentralized model with strong government intervention in Canada, and a decentralized model with weak government influence in the USA.

Keywords

  • Cultural identities
  • Ethnic minority
  • Global higher education reforms
  • Globalization
  • Higher education
  • Higher education policies
  • Indigenous cultures
  • Indigenous higher education
  • Identities
  • Neoliberalism

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Notes

  1. 1.

    Because the term “indigenous” is not used in the Chinese context, this chapter adopts the term “ethnic minority and indigenous” to refer the chosen groups in this study, which are the officially recognized 55 ethnic minority groups in China, First Nations and Métis and Inuit peoples in Canada, and the American Indians and Alaska Natives in the US.

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Xiong, W. (2022). Ethnic Minority and Indigenous Higher Education in the Globalization: Neoliberal Challenges and Opportunities for Policies and Institutions. In: Zajda, J., Jacob, W.J. (eds) Discourses of Globalisation and Higher Education Reforms. Globalisation, Comparative Education and Policy Research, vol 27. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-83136-3_11

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-83136-3_11

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