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An Analysis of the Use of Religious Elements in Assassin’s Creed Origins

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Games and Narrative: Theory and Practice

Abstract

This chapter presents a study of religious elements in Assassin’s Creed Origins (ACO), a videogame from one of Ubisoft’s most famous franchise Assassin’s Creed. ACO is an action-adventure videogame designed and produced by Ubisoft Montreal and released by Ubisoft on October 27, 2017. The game includes an enormous virtual world with storytelling, characters, and real historical context. The virtual worlds implemented by videogames provide players with the opportunity to engage with a constructed reality exhibited by symbols, imagery, and narrative. In this light, videogames can become crucial to learning what religion is, does, and intends to do in contemporary society. Religion can become an essential element in virtual world themes, that is reflected through religious symbols, events, and characters in the protagonist’s life. Religion exists either distinctly (focusing on one religion) or indistinctly (containing a group of belief systems) in videogames. This study practices a holistic approach in understanding the representation of religion in videogames. We present our results in a framework of three key areas where religious themes can exist: game context, characters, and narrative.

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Notes

  1. 1.

    The Nicene Creed is a statement of belief widely used in Christian liturgy. It is called ‘Nicene’ because it was originally adopted in the city of Nicaea (present day İznik, Turkey) by the First Council of Nicaea in 325.

  2. 2.

    Altair is of Arabic origin and means flying eagle or bird. Ezio is of Greek origin means eagle. Arno is of German origin and means strong as an eagle. Haytham is of Arabic origin and means young eagle. Arbaaz is of Urdu origin and means eagle. Orelov is of Russian origin and means the son of the eagle. Griffin is of English origin and is the name of a mythological half-eagle, half-lion creature.

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Ludography

Ludography

Assassin’s Creed (Ubisoft, 2007)

Assassin’s Creed II (Ubisoft, 2009)

Assassin’s Creed Origins (Ubisoft, 2017)

Dante’s Inferno (EA, 2010)

Far Cry 4 (Ubisoft, 2014)

Legend of Zelda (Nintendo, 1986)

Super Mario Bros. (Nintendo, 1985)

World of Warcraft (Blizzard Entertainment, 2004)

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© 2022 The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Switzerland AG

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Mirza, Ö., Sengun, S. (2022). An Analysis of the Use of Religious Elements in Assassin’s Creed Origins. In: Bostan, B. (eds) Games and Narrative: Theory and Practice. International Series on Computer Entertainment and Media Technology. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-81538-7_16

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-81538-7_16

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  • Publisher Name: Springer, Cham

  • Print ISBN: 978-3-030-81537-0

  • Online ISBN: 978-3-030-81538-7

  • eBook Packages: Computer ScienceComputer Science (R0)

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