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What Are Thought Experiments?

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Thought Experiments
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Abstract

Suppose you have a friend who is very naïve when it comes to physics. He follows his commonsense view, uninformed by high-school physics, that heavier bodies fall faster than the light ones: the heavier the body is, the faster it falls. That’s it.

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Notes

  1. 1.

    For a useful short exposition see Peacock, K.A., “Happiest Thoughts Great Thought Experiments of Modern Physics” in Stuart, M, Fehige, Y. and Brown J.R. eds. (2018), 211–241. For an advanced interpretation and discussion see Norton (2013).

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Correspondence to Nenad Miscevic .

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Miscevic, N. (2022). What Are Thought Experiments?. In: Thought Experiments. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-81082-5_1

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