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The Current Role of Stem Cell Therapy and iPS Cells

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Early Osteoarthritis

Abstract

The use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for the treatment of osteoarthritis has been explored extensively over the last two decades, and newer techniques, as well as evaluation of newer cell sources, have been further studied. Cartilage degeneration has been a major obstacle to overcome in orthopaedic surgery, and stem cell therapy has shown reasonable potential in providing an effective solution to this problem. Newer sources of MSCs have been identified with improved cellular properties and, therefore, the possibility for better quality regenerate outcomes. The addition and processing of these cells with scaffolds and other delivery methods have also shown benefits. Furthermore, the discovery of the induced pluripotent cell has opened a more limitless avenue for stem cell treatments, and they overcome various ethical issues faced in the past with embryonal cells; however, the clinical applicability of induced pluripotent cells remains to be determined. In this chapter, we discuss the current stem cell therapies available along with their clinical applications and limitations, with a focus on cartilage repair and regeneration.

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Jacob, G., Shimomura, K., Hart, D.A., Nakamura, N. (2022). The Current Role of Stem Cell Therapy and iPS Cells. In: Lattermann, C., Madry, H., Nakamura, N., Kon, E. (eds) Early Osteoarthritis. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-79485-9_15

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