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Quantum Cryptography as an Approach for Teaching Quantum Physics

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Teaching-Learning Contemporary Physics

Abstract

Quantum physics is not only a fundamental physical theory but recently it promises big technological advances in the so-called 2nd quantum revolution, especially in quantum information. These advances rely on the basic research done since about 1980 while looking for a clarification of the fundamentals of quantum physics. The corresponding experiments and insights paved the way for quantum cryptography which is the first development in quantum information leaving the laboratory and going into practice. These developments should have its influence on teaching physics at school level in order to give students insight into a fascinating and fundamental part of modern physics. Herewith they can experience the fundamental notions of quantum physics: non-determinism, superposition and uncertainty. To achieve this goal an approach exploiting recent results of quantum cryptography and combining it intimately with the fundamentals seems promising. In addition such an approach also permits to introduce students with help of Dirac notation to mathematical structures of quantum physics. This might additionally support understanding quantum concepts without retreating to vague metaphors or descriptions. Therefore, teaching quantum information, especially quantum cryptography, at school may serve for motivating students and at the same time impart insight into physics research and the nature of physics. We present a corresponding teaching–learning proposal that was conducted with teacher students.

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Correspondence to Gesche Pospiech .

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Pospiech, G. (2021). Quantum Cryptography as an Approach for Teaching Quantum Physics. In: Jarosievitz, B., Sükösd, C. (eds) Teaching-Learning Contemporary Physics . Challenges in Physics Education. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-78720-2_2

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