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Toward a Theory of Digital Mindfulness: A Case of Smartphone-Based Self-monitoring

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HCI in Business, Government and Organizations (HCII 2021)

Abstract

‘Digital mindfulness’ refers to the mindful use of digital technologies, such as smartphones. Despite being a topic of significant interest among researchers and practitioners, there is limited empirical evidence about digital mindfulness in existing HCI literature. This ongoing gap in empirical support led to speculation that digital mindfulness might be an academic fad lacking theoretical rigor. As a response, this study is an attempt to investigate digital mindfulness and uncover the mechanism(s) underlying the mindful use of digital technology in the context of smartphones. Specifically, this study argues that ‘self-monitoring’ is an important dimension of digital mindfulness that can be objectively defined, systematically measured, and practically supported by digital tools and technologies. Moreover, adding nuance to smartphone-enabled self-monitoring literature, this paper sheds light on the role of digital mindfulness in the enhancement of productivity as well. This in turn paves the way for theorizing the concept of digital mindfulness specifically within an HCI context.

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Abhari, K. et al. (2021). Toward a Theory of Digital Mindfulness: A Case of Smartphone-Based Self-monitoring. In: Nah, F.FH., Siau, K. (eds) HCI in Business, Government and Organizations. HCII 2021. Lecture Notes in Computer Science(), vol 12783. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-77750-0_35

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-77750-0_35

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