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Mission-Oriented Values as the Bedrock of University Social Responsibility

Part of the Advances in Business Ethics Research book series (ABER,volume 8)

Abstract

This chapter aims to identify current mission-oriented values in the academic setting and their potential impression upon university social responsibility through organisational culture. To achieve this, strategies of Lithuanian public universities were analysed using the manifest coding of qualitative content analysis. Overall, 80 institutional values were identified, refined, grouped, and aligned with types of organisational culture, such as collegiate, bureaucratic, corporate and enterprise. Research findings show that values of competence, the main characteristic of enterprise culture, prevail in strategies of Lithuanian public universities. This implies that it refers to a university’s desire to become, rather than genuinely to be. Furthermore, the impression of institutional values, as an anchor of organisational culture, might affect the way universities perceive their social responsibility, what activities feed into this and what stakeholders are prominent in them.

Keywords

  • University social responsibility
  • Mission-oriented values
  • Academic values
  • Institutional values
  • Strategy
  • Mission statement

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Acknowledgement

For taking the role of the second coder, I thank Raminta Pučėtaitė, Associate Professor at Vilnius University and Kaunas University of Technology (Lithuania) and Adjunct Professor at University of Jyväskylä (Finland). Also, a special thanks goes to Frank den Hond, Ehrnrooth Professor in Management and Organisation at Hanken School of Economics (Finland), for his helpful comments on an early chapter draft. Portion of this chapter was presented at the 34th EGOS colloquium “Surprise in and around Organizations: Journeys to the Unexpected”, Tallinn, Estonia, 2018.

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Tauginienė, L. (2022). Mission-Oriented Values as the Bedrock of University Social Responsibility. In: Poff, D.C. (eds) University Corporate Social Responsibility and University Governance. Advances in Business Ethics Research, vol 8. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-77532-2_6

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