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Models Only Say What They’re Told to Say

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Prediction and Causality in Econometrics and Related Topics (ECONVN 2021)

Part of the book series: Studies in Computational Intelligence ((SCI,volume 983))

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Abstract

This short note is a reminder that all models only say what they are told to say. There can therefore be no discovery by models—discoveries go into models—and thus models should only be used in their predictive form, and only trusted when they have demonstrated independent success.

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Correspondence to William M. Briggs .

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Briggs, W.M. (2022). Models Only Say What They’re Told to Say. In: Ngoc Thach, N., Ha, D.T., Trung, N.D., Kreinovich, V. (eds) Prediction and Causality in Econometrics and Related Topics. ECONVN 2021. Studies in Computational Intelligence, vol 983. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-77094-5_4

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