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The Importance of Theory for Understanding Smart Cities: Making a Case for Ambient Theory

Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNISA,volume 12782)

Abstract

This paper seeks to develop a theoretical foundation for ambient theory as a theory in support of advancing definitions and understandings of smart cities and regions. Through a review of the evolving research literature for the ambient and for smart cities, a conceptual framework is formulated consisting of components and characteristics constituting ambient theory for smart cities and regions. The framework is then operationalized for use in this paper, exploring the practical application of ambient theory in smart cities and regions. Using a case study approach together with an explanatory correlational design, elements such as technology-driven services, creative opportunities, and access to public data are explored. Drawing additionally on other works where this approach is employed, elements such as awareness, information and communication technologies (ICTs), interactivity, and sensing are provided as further examples showing the potential for promising relationships in support of ambient theory for smart cities. Ambient theory as advanced in this paper is discussed in terms of theory usefulness, parsimony, and type. Future directions are identified for explorations of ambient theory going forward for both research and practice in contributing to definitions and understandings of smart cities and regions.

Keywords

  • Adaptability
  • Ambient human-computer interaction
  • Ambient theory
  • Awareness
  • Correlation
  • Creativity
  • Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs)
  • Interactivities
  • Sensing
  • Smart cities
  • Smart environments
  • Theory building

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McKenna, H.P. (2021). The Importance of Theory for Understanding Smart Cities: Making a Case for Ambient Theory. In: Streitz, N., Konomi, S. (eds) Distributed, Ambient and Pervasive Interactions. HCII 2021. Lecture Notes in Computer Science(), vol 12782. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-77015-0_4

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-77015-0_4

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