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Technology Probes to Explore How Children Learn About Gender Stereotypes

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Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNISA,volume 12782)

Abstract

There are widespread gender stereotypes in society that would influence children’s physical and mental cognitive development and future career choices. Gender equality education for children is critical. However, few studies have explored how technology can be used to promote gender equality education and developed educational tools to help children learning gender equality. To explore the HCI form of learning gender stereotypes for children in early adolescence, this paper introduced three technology probes to test with children and drew several conclusions.

Keywords

  • Gender stereotypes
  • Gender equality
  • Digital technology and gender
  • Technology in education

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Acknowledgment

This research was funded by the Engineering Research Center of Computer Aided Product Innovation Design, Ministry of Education, National Natural Science Foundation of China (52075478), Major Project of Zhejiang Social Science Foundation (21XXJC01ZD).

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Correspondence to Weilin Jiang .

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Jiang, W., Su, Y., Liu, S., Ying, F., Yao, C. (2021). Technology Probes to Explore How Children Learn About Gender Stereotypes. In: Streitz, N., Konomi, S. (eds) Distributed, Ambient and Pervasive Interactions. HCII 2021. Lecture Notes in Computer Science(), vol 12782. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-77015-0_15

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-77015-0_15

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