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Radio Systems and Radio Signals

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Part of the Textbooks in Telecommunication Engineering book series (TTE)

Abstract

Radio receivers are an element of a radio system. The first chapter of the book shows the changes in radio systems designed to transmit information, from the moment of their occurrence under the influence of the tasks set during its development. The issues related to the transition from the analog form of the transmitted signal to the digital form on the architecture of networks, the need for relay transmission of a mobile terminal when changing its position in space, and the use of modern technologies that implement these functions are considered. It is formulated how the properties of the transmission medium and interference in the radio channel influence the structure and circuit design of a radio receiving device as part of this system. It is noted that the variety of modern systems caused by their multi-functionality and an even larger number of manufacturers of radio equipment for solving specific problems and conditions of signal propagation have led to difficulties in the exchange of information.

The cardinal solution to this problem was the transition from the regulation of manufacturers’ equipment to control over the interface used, at all levels of interaction described by the reference model for open systems interconnection (OSI). This made it possible to actively develop microcircuitry and build multi-functional integrated circuits, and hence radio receivers, using various technologies and implementation principles for various frequency ranges and transmission media.

Keywords

  • Radio engineering systems
  • Fixed and mobile communications
  • Transmission medium
  • Radio channel
  • Radio interference
  • Interaction of open networks
  • Duplexing
  • Multiple access

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Notes

  1. 1.

    Under the term channel here and later, we understand the radio channel organized between antennas of the receiver and the transmitter, and under the term radio front-end we understand the radio path of the receiver between the antenna and the detector (demodulator), where the signal spectrum is located in the radio range.

    Often, when studying channel coding, the term channel is understood as a part of the architecture of a radio system between the output of the transmitter encoder and the input of the receiver decoder.

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Logvinov, V.V., Smolskiy, S.M. (2022). Radio Systems and Radio Signals. In: Radio Receivers for Systems of Fixed and Mobile Communications. Textbooks in Telecommunication Engineering. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-76628-3_1

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-76628-3_1

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