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Māori-Language Journalism in Aotearoa New Zealand: Balancing Cultural Values, Journalistic Norms and the Constraints of the National-Language Revitalisation Agenda

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Ethnic Journalism in the Global South

Part of the book series: Palgrave Studies in Journalism and the Global South ((PSJGS))

Abstract

This chapter describes the political and social contexts that led to the development of radio and television news for Māori, the indigenous inhabitants of Aotearoa New Zealand, in their heritage language, te reo Māori (the Māori language). Māori-language journalists practise an adaptation of the Anglo-American journalism tradition that allows them to work in ways that align with indigenous cultural norms and contribute to the national agenda to revitalise te reo Māori. The language is considered to be somewhere between definitely endangered and severely endangered.

The author is of indigenous Māori and nineteenth-century British settler heritage and speaks te reo Māori and English. She spent 20 years as an English-language news and features reporter before turning to journalism research. The data that informs this chapter is drawn primarily from the author’s PhD research, which employed video ethnography (11 reporters) as well as qualitative interviews (35 people, the majority working journalists) to explicate Māori-language journalism.

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Notes

  1. 1.

    The story is here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uDfYVpa5xFY&t=3s

  2. 2.

    Source: https://maoridictionary.co.nz/

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Correspondence to Atakohu Middleton .

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Glossary

Source: https://maoridictionary.co.nz/

Hine-nui-te-pō

Female guardian of the dead in Māori thought

Kapa haka

Māori performing group

Karakia

Incantation, ritual chant, chant: A set form of words to state or make effective a ritual activity

Kiore

Mouse, rat

Mana

Prestige, authority, control, power, influence, status, spiritual power, charisma

Manaakitanga

Hospitality, kindness, generosity, support—the process of showing respect, generosity and care for others

Māori

Indigenous person of Aotearoa New Zealand

Marae

Māori community centre

Pākehā

English, foreign, European, exotic

Tangihanga

Funeral, rites for the dead

Tapu

To be sacred, prohibited, restricted

Te Māngai Pāho (TMP)

A broadcasting funding agency to support Māori content

Te reo Māori

The Māori language

Tika

To be correct, true, upright, right, just, fair, accurate, appropriate, lawful, proper, valid

Tikanga

Correct procedure, custom, habit, lore, method, manner, rule, way, code, meaning, plan, practice, convention, protocol—the customary system of values and practices that have developed over time and are deeply embedded in the social context

Tōtara

A species of podocarp tree endemic to Aotearoa New Zealand

Tūpāpaku

Corpse, deceased

Waewae tapu

Newcomer; a person who has not been to a particular marae before

Whakapapa

Genealogy but also the interlocking nature of all things in the natural and spiritual worlds

Whakawhanaungatanga

The process of establishing relationships, relating well to others.

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Middleton, A. (2021). Māori-Language Journalism in Aotearoa New Zealand: Balancing Cultural Values, Journalistic Norms and the Constraints of the National-Language Revitalisation Agenda. In: Gladkova, A., Jamil, S. (eds) Ethnic Journalism in the Global South. Palgrave Studies in Journalism and the Global South. Palgrave Macmillan, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-76163-9_11

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