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Challenges in the Study of Intelligent Machines and Reverse Turing Test on Socio-Economic Decisions

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Part of the Studies in Computational Intelligence book series (SCI,volume 990)

Abstract

The Turing Test (TT) is a thought experiment establishing the existence of a unidirectional proof when applied to ascertain whether a machine has the capability to think, being endowed with artificial intelligence. As pointed out in recent works, however, the test is only a necessary but not a sufficient condition for the purpose for which it was intended. In addressing this issue, we propose an approach between the conceptual and empirical perspective of TT. First, we define what an intelligent machine is by taking into account human behaviors related to decision-making. Then, motivated by recent applications of the reverse Turing test in science, we schematize a possible reversal of the test suitable for coping with emerging, value-based decisions involving intelligent machines. In the wake of this reversal, two applications are given as examples: The first concerns the ethical sphere and stems from any lack of integrity and thoroughness as well as the inconsistency of users of intelligent machines; while the second is represented by inducing individual, organizational, and structural changes in the socio-economic system. In this regard, we argue that a relationally focused approach takes seriously questions of Turing’s endeavors, while also making space for constructive criticism, and might be actually established by integrating artificial intelligence with other cognitive sciences and, nevertheless, with computational social science and digital humanities.

JEL codes

  • C80
  • C89
  • D81
  • D91
  • Y20

Keywords

  • Thought experiment
  • Artificial intelligence
  • Cognitive science
  • Intelligent machines
  • Expert systems
  • Value-based decision-making

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Correspondence to Carmen Pagliari .

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Appendix (Comics Rationale)

Appendix (Comics Rationale)

Licensed under CC-BY 3.0, courtesy of Oliver Widder at https://geek-and-poke.com.

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Pagliari, C., Bucciarelli, E., Chen, SH. (2021). Challenges in the Study of Intelligent Machines and Reverse Turing Test on Socio-Economic Decisions. In: Bucciarelli, E., Chen, SH., Corchado, J.M., Parra D., J. (eds) Decision Economics: Minds, Machines, and their Society. DECON 2020. Studies in Computational Intelligence, vol 990. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-75583-6_2

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