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Avoidance of Deep Sedation

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Reducing Mortality in Critically Ill Patients

Abstract

In spite of advances in support of all organ functions over the last decades, cognitive aspects of intensive care unit admission rarely take the central light. It is a common belief that patients admitted to the ICU are completely asleep at all times, but that does not correspond to truth. In fact, a large and growing body of evidence has shown that sedation is harmful, increasing the risk of infection, delirium, and death, and prolonging the time on mechanical ventilation in the ICU and hospital [1–3]. Modern approach to intensive care aims to a comprehensive approach to the patient well-being, including aspects related to pain, agitation/sedation, delirium, immobility, and sleep disruption [4].

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Correspondence to Pasquale Nardelli .

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Nardelli, P., Fresilli, S., Mucchetti, M. (2021). Avoidance of Deep Sedation. In: Landoni, G., Baiardo Redaelli, M., Sartini, C., Zangrillo, A., Bellomo, R. (eds) Reducing Mortality in Critically Ill Patients. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-71917-3_9

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-71917-3_9

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