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Minds and Robots: An Impassable Border

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Multiplicity and Interdisciplinarity

Part of the book series: Contemporary Systems Thinking ((CST))

Abstract

We present a distinction between the human mind and a robot, mainly based on the presence or absence of a metalanguage. The human mind possesses both metalanguage and formal language (object language), which is a logic, while the robot possesses only the latter, which is provided as a program. The robot cannot use a metalanguage because the latter, devoid of logical rules, is not Turing-computable, and a computer cannot calculate what is incomputable. Metalanguage, which can be seen as the formal language of meta-thought (the thought that thinks of ordinary thought) allows the human mind to overcome the limits of purely mechanical reasoning. This is why a human mind can never be completely reduced to a Turing machine, and instead always will be a robot. Nevertheless, in the quantum case the hypothesis is made that during the programming phase, the programmers mind can become entangled with the quantum robot.

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Zizzi, P., Pregnolato, M. (2021). Minds and Robots: An Impassable Border. In: Minati, G. (eds) Multiplicity and Interdisciplinarity. Contemporary Systems Thinking. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-71877-0_15

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