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Conclusion

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Girls in Contemporary Vampire Fiction

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Abstract

As the intersection of the Gothic, horror, urban fantasy, paranormal romance, chic lit and serialised school story, contemporary popular vampire fiction for adolescent women is uniquely positioned to interrogate the possibilities and limitations of growing up a girl and becoming a woman in the Western societies of the new millennium. Historically figured as a dangerous disruption to the established social order, the quintessence of female sexual voraciousness or an innocent or collusive victim of the vampire’s bite (Wisker, Contemporary Women’s Gothic Fiction: Carnival, Hauntings and Vampire Kisses, Palgrave Macmillan, London, 2016, 159), the new vampire girl—or the vampire’s girlfriend—has come to articulate the joys and struggles of Western adolescent femininity, offering new insights into the figure of the vampire as a metaphor for human existence. This chapter summarises the key aspects of the complex narratives of girlhood explored throughout this volume and points to the readers’ reception as another worthy terrain for future work on vampire fiction for girls.

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Notes

  1. 1.

    In fact, P.C. and Kristin Cast have pointed to the relatability of their characters as one of the key objectives of their writing projects (Forgotten 255; Baker 2015).

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Correspondence to Agnieszka Stasiewicz-Bieńkowska .

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Stasiewicz-Bieńkowska, A. (2021). Conclusion. In: Girls in Contemporary Vampire Fiction. Palgrave Gothic. Palgrave Macmillan, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-71744-5_7

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