Skip to main content

Pastiching the Popular

  • 222 Accesses

Abstract

This chapter examines a range of films by different female directors that exemplify heightened genre to show that popular films cannot be separated into emotive or intellectual categories. These evolve from chick-flick remakes focused on love and the domestic sphere to the ‘masculine’ war film via the notionally gender-ambivalent territory of teenpics and teen fantasy or Gothic, which in itself gives the lie to rigid distinctions. Harrod evaluates the gender politics of particular ways in which genre texts exploit conventional tropes to powerfully engage viewers, paying attention not so much to narrative novelty as formal nuance achieved through practices of pastiche-style quilting of original models, often imagined spatially. The analysis thus outlines various ways in which films’ affective address relies on blatant genericity, including through nostalgia.

By reversing the terms of the oppositions and the values of the hierarchies, we remain, of course, prisoners of the paradigms, only just barely able to dream a universe where the categories of general and particular, mass and detail, and masculine and feminine would no longer order our thinking and our seeing.

—Naomi Schor, Reading in Detail

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

Buying options

Chapter
USD   29.95
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • DOI: 10.1007/978-3-030-70994-5_3
  • Chapter length: 88 pages
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
  • Exclusive offer for individuals only
  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
eBook
USD   79.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • ISBN: 978-3-030-70994-5
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
  • Exclusive offer for individuals only
  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
Softcover Book
USD   99.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
Hardcover Book
USD   139.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
Fig. 3.1
Fig. 3.2
Fig. 3.3
Fig. 3.4
Fig. 3.5
Fig. 3.6
Fig. 3.7
Fig. 3.8
Fig. 3.9
Fig. 3.10

Notes

  1. 1.

    On the remake as reception category, see also Leitch (1990: 139), Moine (2007: 33), Evans (2014: 305), as well as Hutcheon (2006) on adaptation.

  2. 2.

    Discussing cinema, Victor Perkins memorably notes that worldhood is ‘not primarily an issue of realism’ (2005: 36).

  3. 3.

    Grodal (1999: 131–133) also indicates that strategies foregrounding a layer of mediation in film representation ‘short-circuit[ing] evaluations of reality status’ not only ‘evoke feelings, although they pretend to say something about representations and epistemology in general’, but that they specifically draw us out of the introjective mode promoted by less self-conscious fiction.

  4. 4.

    Cf. Nacache in Forrest and Koos (2001: 28), Heinze and Krämer (2015: 12). Rebecca Bushnell (2018: 45) makes the same arguments about genre in a literary context.

  5. 5.

    While Butler stops short of ascribing automatically progressive value to drag (1990: xxiii), Galt is less reticent in her claims for the power of theatricality itself as posing a challenge to authoritarian regimes (notably White dominance), as her discussions of the work of the fantasy films of Tsai Ming-Liang and the pastiche melodramas of François Ozon convey. She also describes aesthetically ostensive versions of pre-existing visual models as introducing new and intersubjective dimensions through the example of Zwelu Mthethwa’s ‘ethnographic’ but unusually colourful photographs and paintings of shantytowns (Galt 2011: 266; 16).

  6. 6.

    Within the genre broadly defined, Ephron herself also directed Bewitched (2005), remaking the homonymous television show; however, as (largely negative) reviews almost unanimously noted, despite its identical nomenclature this film departs very substantially from its predecessor, to which it bears a strongly revisionist rather than pastiche relationship, hence its exclusion from this study.

  7. 7.

    You’ve Got Mail was co-written with Ephron’s sister Delia.

  8. 8.

    Secrets of Cinema: The Oscars, broadcast on BBC4 at 9 p.m. on 17 July 2018.

  9. 9.

    For instance, Negra (2008), Tasker and Negra (2007: 15); see also Illouz (1997) on romantic discourses in general.

  10. 10.

    For instance, Virginia Woolf or Marguerite Duras.

  11. 11.

    For instance, by Hans Robert Jauss (1982: 22), even before Neale’s (1990: 49) discussion of ‘expectation and anticipation’.

  12. 12.

    This is especially true in the late 1980s to 2000s, a fertile period for family fare in Hollywood. See among other hybrids The Princess Bride (1987), Groundhog Day (1983), About a Boy (2002), Love, Actually (2003), Lohan vehicle Freaky Friday (2003, sold in a double edition DVD with The Parent Trap ) or even films in the Meet the Parents series (2000, 2004 and 2010, with a television series the latter year).

  13. 13.

    It is also the case that whereas it was assumed that Mitch’s wealth needed no explanation, Nick’s backstory constructs him as an equally neoliberal creation, self-made through a successful vineyard; however, this is not focused on to the same extent as Elizabeth’s creativity.

  14. 14.

    Figures sourced from imdb.com.

  15. 15.

    Dennis Quaid frames this cultural significance in terms of (gendered) star fandom, opining: ‘Ask any man over 35… Hayley Mills [playing the twins] was a babe.’ In Bernstein et al. (1998: 28).

  16. 16.

    If The Parent Trap foregrounds the way that remakes work like families through reproduction with variation, Celestino Deleyto (2009: 7) (among others) has made the same observation about film genres, invoking Wittgenstein’s apposite notion of ‘family resemblances’ to describe their nature.

  17. 17.

    Radner here diverges from the standard nomenclature and view of contemporaneous ‘post-’feminism as evolving out of earlier feminisms.

  18. 18.

    The Meyers stock character of the negatively coded younger woman ‘wrong partner’ also fits squarely within generic paradigms—without rendering it entirely unproblematic from a feminist perspective concerned with intergenerational sisterhood.

  19. 19.

    A further element blurring boundaries between text and author is Meyers’ overidentification with Hollywood itself, an image she has fed, such as by comparing herself to the lead actress of screwball His Girl Friday Rosalind Russell (Howard Hawks, 1940) (see Jermyn 2017b: 37).

  20. 20.

    With her then husband Charles Shyer, Meyers also co-wrote the neo-screwball I Love Trouble (Shyer, 1994).

  21. 21.

    Jermyn (2017b) compares Meyers’ ‘happy endings’ to Sirkean ‘false’ ones in her analysis of What Women Want .

  22. 22.

    Teenpics that explicitly involve homoeroticism and/or homosexuality, as does female director Karyn Kusama’s teen horror Jennifer’s Body (2009), in this sense heighten that aspect of the whole genre.

  23. 23.

    See also Shary (2014: 2).

  24. 24.

    The fact that a recent feature-length teenpic remix featuring clips from over 200 teen films was entitled Beyond Clueless (Charlie Lyne, 2014) signals Clueless’ ongoing urtext status in the genre. Lesley Speed (2016: 224) also suggests Heckerling’s pioneering role in a trend for women to direct ‘low’ comedies, such as Joy of Sex (Martha Coolidge, 1984), Wayne’s World (Penelope Spheeris, 1996) and Private Parts (Betty Thomas, 1997), post-Fast Times.

  25. 25.

    Ben Aslinger (2014: 128) also notes that the use of covers ‘signals the importance of music from youth and early childhood to teenage aesthetics’.

  26. 26.

    For a detailed discussion of language in Clueless, see O’Meara (2014).

  27. 27.

    These are the theme of sex; the lack of focus on education, on familial situations, on politics, or on class; relatively equal gender presence; and textual status as a literary adaptation.

  28. 28.

    The issue of gendered delivery is picked up explicitly in I Could Never Be Your Woman when Rosie advises Izzie not to hold back on screeching to appear demurely ‘feminine’ for the sake of a boy she admires when delivering a (rewritten) version of Alanis Morissette’s ‘Ironic’.

  29. 29.

    Figures sources from www.imdb.com.

  30. 30.

    See, for example, Turim (2003: 45).

  31. 31.

    Turim too has observed that the existence of the Clueless video interface foregrounds how Clueless —like much popular culture—is about the formation of virtual group identities outside a purely textual model of identification or voyeurism (2003: 49).

  32. 32.

    With an eponymous film in 1992 and television show from 1997 to 2003 (on WBTV/UPN).

  33. 33.

    For example, see comments by users Maria Onaiza Pelayo and Jenaizaki Deviant on YouTube: ‘Gene Austin, A Garden in the Rain (1929)’: www.youtube.com/watch?v=zMu-6bSCzlM.

  34. 34.

    See Spooner (2006: 104); for relevant discussions of feminist horror or Gothic elements, respectively, in Carrie and on The Beguiled , see Paszkiewicz (2018b), Backman Rogers (2019: ‘The Beguiled’).

  35. 35.

    Fazekas and Vena (2020: 239) provide an up-to-date reckoning of 220,000 stories on just one of several relevant sites.

  36. 36.

    For instance, Clarke and Osborn (2010), Anatole (2010), Click et al. (2010), Larsson and Steiner (2011a), Wilson (2011), Parke and Wilson (2011), Morey (2012b).

  37. 37.

    A very recent exception is Angie Fazekas and Dan Vena’s (2020: 238–239) brief commentary on Hardwicke’s evocative camerawork and use of colour.

  38. 38.

    Mathijs and Sexton make the same point about Kathryn Bigelow, for whom the situation—unlike Hardwicke’s—has arguably shifted somewhat since the time of their writing in 2011, if not before.

  39. 39.

    For a more detailed account see Edwards-Behi (2014).

  40. 40.

    For a famous example on The Piano , see Sobchack (2004: 61–66) (while relevant discussion of Ferran is cited in Harrod [2016: 70, note 16]).

  41. 41.

    See also McElroy and McElroy (2010) on the film’s ‘eco-Gothics’. Both this and Parmiter’s analyses link the issue to American frontier histories in ways that point to a relationship between the American Gothic and the Western, whose descendants I later argue include the war film and other stories of masculine conflict, such as Detroit .

  42. 42.

    For a different perspective on this detail and its possible sources of inspiration, see Osborn (2010).

  43. 43.

    On fairy-tale resonances in Twilight, see Kramar (2010), Ruddell (2014).

  44. 44.

    Grodal also points out that studies of art and film form, including Eisenstein’s well-known work, gave prominence to the emotional impact of ‘defamiliarization’ techniques before Brecht’s concept of Verfremdung came to dominate discussions (ibid.: 214–215). My interpretation differs from Smith’s (2017: 165), for whom this scene exemplifies Twilight’s general tendency towards ‘remain[ing] unusually earnest, heavy-handed even, in its portrayal of the growing romance between Bella and Edward’—if anything, the so-called heaviness of the narration equates to lightness of address, as my later comments on the fannish pleasures of ‘clumsy’ dialogue reflect.

  45. 45.

    As several commentators noticed, another is Bigelow’s Near Dark (1987), which—perhaps unexpectedly for a more formally experimental film—Simon Bacon (2014: 140) finds to be implicitly more conservative than Twilight in its neutralisation of the vampire clan as a possible alternative to traditional family structures.

  46. 46.

    For instance, Kapurch (2012), Driscoll (2012: 98).

  47. 47.

    While literary scholar Katie Kapurch (2012) tends to reduce her analysis of Twilight’s extensive ‘first-person’ narration to its use of voiceover.

  48. 48.

    Fazekas and Vena (2020: 239–240) list several critiques of Stewart’s acting, which they also see conversely as providing a point of entry for active engagement in its very ‘flatness’. The term resonates with later discussions of Berlantian ‘flat affect’ in Stop-Loss , conceived as a means to stop conventions sedimenting into unnoticeability. Smith indicates that she is basing her claims on Petersen’s data but I can find no such reference within the latter’s article.

  49. 49.

    For a conservative reading of the image of the unbitten apple in Twilight, see Averill (2011).

  50. 50.

    ‘The Curious Case of Rutherford and Frye: A Frytful Scare Part 1,’ BBC Radio 4, 30 October 2019 https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m0009qtl. Milly Williamson (2005) has further suggested that Gothic vampires in particular are popular with fans who enjoy a highly active interpretive relationship with their texts.

  51. 51.

    While all these analyses pertain to the entire series, many of Hunt’s arguments arise from the first film. Both his and Bacon’s (2014) work draw out suggestively the critical possibilities of pastiche as instantiating both closeness and distance.

  52. 52.

    See Jones (2012), focusing on how written slash fictions embroider upon the Twilight films in particular.

  53. 53.

    Although we have seen that I am less wedded than is Paszkiewicz to haptics as a paradigm.

  54. 54.

    Although Bruce Bennett (2010) accuses De Palma’s film of ultimately maintaining hierarchies of authenticity that naturalise cinematic ‘truth’ and superiority.

  55. 55.

    For Yvonne Tasker and Eylem Atakav, likewise: ‘The sort of “damaged” masculinity presented in The Hurt Locker is something of a cliché within the genre, one which the film relies upon rather than interrogates’ (2010: 66).

  56. 56.

    Eberwein classes both Iraq wars on film together, while also noting some evolutions in depictions. His extrapolations about gender delineate in fact the proto-queer contours of any cultural production in and of itself, as a potential contributor to (re-)writing subjectivities. It is as well to reiterate, then, that any oppressive hegemonic norms ‘rewritten’ remain putative. While Annemarie Jagose (2015) has pointed out that antinormativity does not necessarily produce desirable political outcomes for many marginalised subjects—as the Sergeant Barnes example illustrates—the ‘antisocial turn’ in queer theory specifically can risk treating all existing, multiplicitous and contradictory, norms monolithically as a body to be transgressed. This point resonates with genre films, whose infinitely deferential semantic structure negates the possibility of a perfect original against which change might absolutely define itself.

  57. 57.

    Paszkiewicz draws on Thomas Elsaesser and Malte Hagener’s claim that a focus on eyes in cinema can ‘be the occasion for an unrelenting demand for self-examination to the point of self-recrimination’ in her discussion of a comparable ‘hypertrophy of the visual’ in The Hurt Locker (2018: 107–108).

  58. 58.

    For a fuller discussion of The Deer Hunter as a genre film, see Hellmann (1991).

  59. 59.

    If Eberwein (2010: 104) charts the process by which military commanders in war films become increasingly inhumane with the advent of the Vietnam cycle, this trajectory arguably reaches its apogee with The Hurt Locker , where the controlling ‘body’ of the bomb disposal device is literally inhuman. Pisters argues that ‘reality does not disappear but returns with a vengeance’ even when war is technologised in such films (2010: 250).

  60. 60.

    Both Burgoyne and Paszkiewicz in their readings of The Hurt Locker likewise emphasise what the former calls ‘war as a somatic engagement’. Burgoyne’s elaboration that this ‘takes place outside any larger meta-narrative of nation or history’ (cited in Paszkiewicz 2018a: 117) does not contradict my suggestion that such affects can be and (still, or perhaps even increasingly) are harnessed to the more unified emotional ends of nationalism or other political allegiances.

  61. 61.

    These scholars tie flat affect in Berlant specifically to genre when they cite her observation that ‘generic performance always involves moments of potential collapse that threaten the contract the genre makes with the viewer to fulfil experiential expectations. But these blockages or surprises are usually part of the convention and not a transgression of it’ (in Duschinsky and Wilson 2015: 180).

Works Cited

  • Abramowitz, Rachel (2000), Is That a Gun in Your Pocket? Women’s Experience of Power in Hollywood, London: Vintage.

    Google Scholar 

  • Anatole, Giselle Liza (ed.) (2010), Bringing Light to Twilight, London and Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

    Google Scholar 

  • Anderegg, Michael (1991), ‘Hollywood and Vietnam: John Wayne and Jane Fonda as Discourse,’ in Anderegg (ed.), Inventing Vietnam: The War in Film and Television, Philadelphia: Temple University Press, pp. 15–32.

    Google Scholar 

  • Aslinger, Ben (2014) ‘Clueless About Listening Formations?’ Cinema Journal 53 (3) (Spring): 126–131.

    Google Scholar 

  • Averill, Lindsay Issow (2011), ‘Un-biting the Apple and Killing the Womb: Genesis, Gender, and Gynocide,’ in Maggie Parke and Natalie Wilson (eds), Theorizing Twilight: Critical Essays on What’s at Stake in a Post-Vampire World, Jefferson, NC and London: McFarland and Co., pp. 224–237.

    Google Scholar 

  • Backman Rogers, Anna (2019), Sofia Coppola: The Politics of Visual Pleasure, New York: Berghahn Books (British Library digital collection).

    Google Scholar 

  • Bacon, Simon (2014), ‘The Cullens: Family Mimicry and the Post-Colonial Vampire,’ in Wickham Clayton and Sarah Harman (eds), Screening Twilight: Critical Approaches to a Cinematic Phenomenon, London: I. B. Tauris, pp. 139–150.

    Google Scholar 

  • Balaban, Yael (2012), ‘Double Mimesis: Sensory Representations in Literature,’ in Saija Isomaa, Sari Kivitso, Pirjo Lyytikainen, Sanna Nyqvist, Merja Polvinen and Riikka Rossi (eds), Rethinking Mimesis: Concepts and Practices of Literary Representation, Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, pp. 161–180.

    Google Scholar 

  • Bellas, Athena (2012), Review of Teen Film: A Critical Introduction by Catherine Driscoll, Senses of Cinema 63 (June). http://sensesofcinema.com/2012/book-reviews/teen-film-a-critical-introduction-by-catherine-driscoll/

  • Bennett, Bruce (2010), ‘Framing Terror: Cinema, Docudrama and the “War on Terror”,’ Studies in Documentary Film 4 (3): 209–225.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Bernstein, Jill, Oliver Jones, Kindra Peach and Maximillian Potter (1998), ‘In the Works: Twin Trouble—1998 Remix,’ Premiere (UK) 11 (6): 28–29.

    Google Scholar 

  • Besson, Philippe (2017), Arrête avec tes mensonges, Paris: Juillard, Kindle Edition.

    Google Scholar 

  • Bordwell, David (2002), ‘Intensified Continuity Visual Style in Contemporary American Film,’ Film Quarterly 55 (3) (Spring): 16–28.

    Google Scholar 

  • Bradbury-Rance, Clara (2019), Lesbian Cinema after Queer Theory, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Branch, Lori (2010), ‘Carlisle’s Cross: Locating the Post-Secular Gothic,’ in Amy M. Clarke and Marijane Osborn (eds), The Twilight Mystique: Critical Essays on the Novels and Films, Jefferson, NC and London: McFarland and Co., pp. 60–79.

    Google Scholar 

  • Brinkema, Eugenie (2014), The Forms of the Affects, Durham, NC: Duke University Press.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Burgoyne, Robert (2008), The Hollywood Historical Film, Hoboken, NJ: Wiley Blackwell.

    Google Scholar 

  • Burns, Amy (2011), ‘“Tell me all about your new man”: (Re)Constructing Masculinity in Contemporary Chick Texts,’ Networking Knowledge: Journal of the MeCCSA Postgraduate Network 4 (1). Online.

    Google Scholar 

  • Bushnell, Rebecca (2018), ‘Time and Genre,’ in Thomas M. Allen (ed.), Time and Literature, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 44–56.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Butler, Judith (1990), Gender Trouble: Feminism and the Subversion of Identity, London and New York: Routledge.

    Google Scholar 

  • Carlsson, Mikael (1999), ‘The Parent Trap: Review of soundtrack by Alan Silvestri,’ in Music from the Movies 22: 26.

    Google Scholar 

  • Carter, David Ray (2010), ‘It’s Only a Movie? Reality as Transgression in Exploitation Cinema,’ in John Cline and Robert Weiner (eds), From the Arthouse to the Grindhouse: Highbrow and Lowbrow Transgression in Cinema’s First Century, Lanham: Scarecrow Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Cherry, Brigid (2014), ‘Defanging the Vampire: Projected Interactivity and Twilight Fanfic,’ in Wickham Clayton and Sarah Harman (eds), Screening Twilight: Critical Approaches to a Cinematic Phenomenon, London: I. B. Tauris, pp. 173–186.

    Google Scholar 

  • Chow, Rey (2001), ‘A Souvenir of Love,’ in Esther C. M. Yau (ed.), At Full Speed: Hong Kong Cinema in a Borderless World, Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, pp. 209–229.

    Google Scholar 

  • Clarke, Amy M. and Marijane Osborn (eds) (2010), The Twilight Mystique: Critical Essays on the Novels and Films, Jefferson, NC and London: McFarland and Co.

    Google Scholar 

  • Click, Melissa A., Jennifer Steven Aubrey and Elizabeth Behm-Morawitz (eds) (2010), Bitten by Twilight: Youth Culture, Media, and the Vampire Franchise, New York: Peter Lang.

    Google Scholar 

  • Clover, Carol J. (1992), Men, Women and Chain Saws: Gender in the Modern Horror Film, Princeton: Princeton University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Cobb, Shelley (2015), Adaptation, Authorship, and Contemporary Women Filmmakers, London: Palgrave Macmillan.

    Google Scholar 

  • Cole, Janis and Holly Dale (1993), Calling the Shots: Profiles of Women Filmmakers, Kingston, ON: Quarry Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Colling, Samantha (2017), The Aesthetic Pleasures of Girl Teen Film, New York and London: Bloomsbury.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Craig, Pamela and Martin Fradley (2010), ‘Teenage Traumata: Youth, Affective Politics and the Contemporary American Horror Film,’ in Steffen Hantke (ed.), American Horror Film: The Genre at the Turn of the Millennium, Jackson: University of Mississippi Press, pp. 77–102.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Cunningham, Mark D. (2012), ‘Traveling in the Same Boat: Adapting Stephanie Meyer’s Twilight, New Moon, and Eclipse to Film,’ in Anne Morey (ed.), Genre, Reception and Adaptation in the ‘Twilight’ Series, Farnham: Ashgate, pp. 199–214.

    Google Scholar 

  • Deleyto, Celestino (2009), The Secret Life of Romantic Comedy, Manchester: Manchester University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Demory, Pamela H. (2010), ‘The Pleasures of Adapting: Reading, Viewing, Logging On,’ in Amy M. Clarke and Marijane Osborn (eds), The Twilight Mystique: Critical Essays on the Novels and Films, Jefferson, NC and London: McFarland and Co., pp. 204–216.

    Google Scholar 

  • Doherty, Thomas (2002), Teenagers and Teenpics: The Juvenalization of American Movies in the 1950s, Philadelphia: Temple University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Driscoll, Catherine (2011), Teen Film: A Critical Introduction. Oxford, Berg.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • ——— (2012), ‘Girl Culture and the “Twilight” Franchise,’ in Anne Morey (ed.), Genre, Reception and Adaptation in the ‘Twilight’ Series, Farnham: Ashgate, pp. 95–112.

    Google Scholar 

  • Duschinsky, Robbie and Emma Wilson (2015), ‘Flat Affect, Joyful Politics and Enthralled Attachments: Engaging with the Work of Lauren Berlant,’ International Journal of Politics, Culture and Society 28 (3): 179–190.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Dyer, Richard (2007), Pastiche, London and New York: Routledge.

    Google Scholar 

  • ——— (2020), The Culture of Queers, London and New York: Routledge.

    Google Scholar 

  • Eberwein, Robert (2010), The Hollywood War Film, Hoboken, NJ: Wiley-Blackwell.

    Google Scholar 

  • Edwards-Behi, Nia (2014), ‘The Twilight Saga: Genre and Reception,’ in Wickham Clayton and Sarah Harman (eds), Screening Twilight: Critical Approaches to a Cinematic Phenomenon, London: I. B. Tauris, pp. 40–48.

    Google Scholar 

  • Evans, Jonathan (2014), ‘Film Remakes, the Black Sheep of Translation,’ Translation Studies 7 (3): 300–314.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Fazekas, Angie and Dan Vena (2020), ‘“What were We—Idiots?”: Re-evaluating Female Spectatorship and the New Horror Heroine with Catherine Hardwicke’s Twilight (2008),’ in Katarzyna Paszkiewicz and Stacy Rusnak (eds), Final Girls, Feminism and Popular Culture, New York: Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 229–245.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Feeney, F. X. (2008), ‘The Politics of Narrative,’ October 12 (7): 2008.

    Google Scholar 

  • Feuer, Jane (1993), The Hollywood Musical, Bloomington: Indiana University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Forrest, Jennifer and Leonard R. Koos (2001), ‘Reviewing Remakes: An Introduction,’ in Forrest and Koos (eds), Dead Ringers: The Remake in Theory and Practice, New York: State University of New York Press, pp. 1–36.

    Google Scholar 

  • Freeman, Elizabeth (2010), Time Binds: Queer Temporalities, Queer Histories, Durham, NC: Duke University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Freud, Sigmund (2005), ‘Mourning and Melancholia,’ in On Murder, Mourning and Melancholia, trans. Shaun Whiteside, London: Penguin, pp. 201–218.

    Google Scholar 

  • Galt, Rosalind (2011), Pretty: Film and the Decorative Image, New York: Columbia University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Garrett, Roberta (2007), Postmodern Chick-Flicks: The Return of the Woman’s Film, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Gledhill, Christine (2017), ‘Preface,’ in Mary Harrod and Katarzyna Paskiewicz (eds), Women Do Genre in Film and Television, London and New York: Routledge, pp. ix–xiv.

    Google Scholar 

  • González Iñárritu, Alejandro (2008), ‘Kimberly Peirce,’ Interview (April): 124–125.

    Google Scholar 

  • Goodridge, Mike (2008), ‘Stop-Loss,’ Screen International (28 March): 16.

    Google Scholar 

  • Grodal, Torben (1999), Moving Pictures: A New Theory of Film Genres, Feelings, and Cognition, Oxford: Oxford University Press.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Halberstam, Jack (2005), In a Queer Time and Place: Transgender Bodies, Subcultural Lives, New York: New York University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • ——— (2011), The Queer Art of Failure, Durham, NC: Duke University Press.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Harman, Sarah and Bethan Jones (2013), ‘Fifty Shades of Ghey: Snark Fandom and the Figure of the AntiFan,’ Sexualities 16 (8): 951–968.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Harrington, C. Lee and Denise D. Bielby (2010), ‘A Life Course Perspective on Fandom,’ International Journal of Cultural Studies 13 (5): 429–450.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Harrod, Mary (2010), ‘The Aesthetics of Pastiche in the Work of Richard Linklater,’ Screen 51 (1): 21–37.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • ——— (2016), ‘“As If a Girl’s Reach Should Exceed Her Grasp”: Gendering Genericity and Spectatorial Address in the Work of Amy Heckerling,’ in Frances Smith and Timothy Shary (eds), Refocus on the Films of Amy Heckerling, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, pp. 53–72.

    Google Scholar 

  • Heinze, Rüdiger and Lucia Krämer (2015), ‘Introduction: Remakes and Remaking: Preliminary Reflections,’ in Rüdiger and Krämer (eds), Remakes and Remaking: Concepts, Media, Practices, Bielefeld: Transcript Verlag, pp. 7–19.

    Google Scholar 

  • Hellmann, John (1991), ‘Vietnam and the Hollywood Genre Film: Inversions of American Mythology in The Deer Hunter and Apocalypse Now,’ in Michael Anderegg (ed.), Inventing Vietnam: The War in Film and Television, Philadelphia: Temple University Press, pp. 56–80.

    Google Scholar 

  • Herbert, Daniel (2017), Film Remakes and Franchises, New Brunswick and Newark: Rutgers University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Horne, Jackie C. (2012), ‘Postfeminist Fantasies: Sexuality and Femininity in Stephanie Meyer’s “Twilight” Series,’ in Anne Morey (ed.), Genre, Reception and Adaptation in the ‘Twilight’ Series, Farnham: Ashgate, pp. 29–46.

    Google Scholar 

  • Hui, Wang (2016), ‘The Magic Appeal: Fantasy Elements in the Twilight Series,’ Sino-US English Teaching 13 (3) (March): 219–224.

    Google Scholar 

  • Hunt, R. Justin (2014), ‘Scent, Siblings, and the Filial: Queering Twilight,’ in Wickham Clayton and Sarah Harman (eds), Screening Twilight: Critical Approaches to a Cinematic Phenomenon, London: I. B. Tauris, pp. 164–170.

    Google Scholar 

  • Hunting, Kyra (2014), ‘Furiously Franchised: Clueless, Convergence Culture and the Female-Focused Franchise,’ Cinema Journal 53 (3) (Spring): 145–151.

    Google Scholar 

  • Hurd, Mary G. (2007), Women Directors and Their Films, Westport, CT: Praeger.

    Google Scholar 

  • Hustvedt, Siri (2012), Living, Thinking, Looking, London: Sceptre.

    Google Scholar 

  • Hutcheon, Linda (1989), The Politics of Postmodernism, London and New York: Routledge.

    Google Scholar 

  • ——— (2006), A Theory of Adaptation, London and New York: Routledge.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Illouz, Eva (1997), Constructing the Romantic Utopia: Love and the Cultural Contradictions of Capitalism, Berkeley: University of California Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Isomaa, Saija, Sari Kivitso, Pirjo Lyytikainen, Sanna Nyqvist, Merja Polvinen and Riikka Rossi (2012), ‘Introduction: Rethinking Mimesis,’ in Saija Isomaa, Sari Kivitso, Pirjo Lyytikainen, Sanna Nyqvist, Merja Polvinen and Riikka Rossi (eds), Rethinking Mimesis: Concepts and Practices of Literary Representation, Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, pp. vii–xviii.

    Google Scholar 

  • Jagose, Annamarie (2015), ‘The Trouble with Antinormativity,’ Differences 26 (1): 26–47.

    Google Scholar 

  • Jauss, Hans Robert (1982), Towards an Aesthetic of Reception, trans. Timothy Bahti, Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Jeffers McDonald, Tamar (2007), Romantic Comedy: Boy Meets Girl Meets Genre, London: Wallflower.

    Google Scholar 

  • Jeffords, Susan (1990), ‘Reproducing Fathers: Gender and the Vietnam War in US Culture,’ in Linda Dittman and Gene Michaud (eds), From Hanoi to Hollywood: The Vietnam War in American Film, New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Jermyn, Deborah (2017a), Nancy Meyers. London: Bloomsbury.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • ——— (2017b), ‘The Contemptible Realm of the Romcom Queen: Nancy Meyers, Cultural Value and Romantic Comedy,’ in Mary Harrod and Katarzyna Paszkiewicz (eds), Women Do Genre in Film and Television, London and New York: Routledge, pp. 57–71.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Jones, Bethan (2012), ‘Normal Female Interest in Vampires and Werewolves Bonking: Slash and the Reconstruction of Meaning,’ in Anne Morey (ed.), Genre, Reception and Adaptation in the ‘Twilight’ Series, Farnham: Ashgate, pp. 187–204.

    Google Scholar 

  • Jung, Carl G. (1968), Man and his Symbols, New York: Laurel-Dell.

    Google Scholar 

  • Kane, Kathryn (2010), ‘A Very Queer Refusal: The Chilling Effect of the Cullens’ Heteronormative Embrace,’ in Melissa A. Click, Jennifer Steven Aubrey and Elizabeth Behm-Morawitz (eds), Bitten by Twilight: Youth Culture, Media, and the Vampire Franchise, New York: Peter Lang.

    Google Scholar 

  • Kapurch, Katie (2012), ‘“I’d Never Given Much Thought to How I Would Die”: Uses (and the Decline) of Voiceover in the “Twilight” Films,’ in Anne Morey (ed.), Genre, Reception and Adaptation in the ‘Twilight’ Series, Farnham: Ashgate, pp. 181–197.

    Google Scholar 

  • Kaveney, Roz (2006), Teen Dreams: Reading Teen films and Television from Heathers to Veronica Mars, London: I. B. Tauris.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • King, Claire Sisco (2011), Washed in Blood: Male Sacrifice, Trauma and the Cinema, New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Kramar (2010), ‘The Wolf in the Woods: Representations of “Little Red Riding Hood” in Twilight,’ in Giselle Liza Anatole (ed.), Bringing Light to Twilight, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 15–29.

    Google Scholar 

  • Kristeva, Julia (1980), Pouvoirs de l’horreur: essai sur l’abjection, Paris: Éditions du Seuil.

    Google Scholar 

  • ——— (1993), ‘Le Temps des femmes,’ in Les Nouvelles maladies de l’âme, Paris: Fayard, pp. 297–332.

    Google Scholar 

  • Larsson, Mariah and Ann Steiner (eds) (2011a), Interdisciplinary Approaches to Twilight: Studies in Fiction, Media and a Contemporary Cultural Experience, Lund: Nordic Academic Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • ——— (2011b), ‘Introduction,’ in Larsson and Steiner (eds), Interdisciplinary Approaches to Twilight: Studies in Fiction, Media and a Contemporary Cultural Experience, Lund: Nordic Academic Press, pp. 9–28.

    Google Scholar 

  • Leitch, Thomas (1990), ‘Twice-Told Tales: The Rhetoric of the Remake,’ Film Quarterly 18 (3): 138–149.

    Google Scholar 

  • Leppert, Alice (2014), ‘Can I Please Give You Some Advice? Clueless and the Teen Makeover,’ Cinema Journal 53 (3) (Spring): 131–137.

    Google Scholar 

  • Link, Alex (2018), ‘The Mysteries of Postmodernism, or, Fredric Jameson’s Gothic Plots,’ Gothic Studies 11 (1): 70–85.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Loock, Kathleen and Constantine Verevis (2012), ‘Introduction: Remake/Remodel,’ in Loock and Verevis (eds), Film Remakes, Adaptations and Fan Productions, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 1–15.

    Google Scholar 

  • Lynch, Deirdre (2003), ‘Clueless: About History,’ in Suzanne R. Pucci and James Thompson (eds), Jane Austen and Co.: Remaking the Past in Contemporary Culture, New York: SUNY Press, pp. 71–92.

    Google Scholar 

  • Lyytikainen, Pirjo (2012), ‘Paul Ricœur and the Role of Plot in Narrative Worldmaking,’ in Saija Isomaa, Sari Kivitso, Pirjo Lyytikainen, Sanna Nyqvist, Merja Polvinen and Riikka Rossi (eds), Rethinking Mimesis: Concepts and Practices of Literary Representation, Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, pp. 47–72.

    Google Scholar 

  • Marshall, Kelli (2009), ‘Something’s Gotta Give and the Classical Screwball Comedy,’ Journal of Popular Film and Television 37 (1): 9–15.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Martin, Adrian (2009), ‘Live to Tell: Teen Movies Yesterday and Today,’ Lumina 2: 6–14.

    Google Scholar 

  • Mathijs, Ernest and Jamie Sexton (2011), Cult Cinema: An Introduction, London and Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • McAndrew, Frank T. (2016), ‘Why are High School Memories Burned into Our Brains?’ The Guardian, Thursday 2 June. https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2016/jun/02/high-school-memories-teenagers

  • McElroy, James and Emma Catherine McElroy (2010), ‘Eco-Gothics for the Twenty-First Century,’ in Amy M. Clarke and Marijane Osborn (eds), The Twilight Mystique: Critical Essays on the Novels and Films, Jefferson, NC and London: McFarland and Co., pp. 80–91.

    Google Scholar 

  • Mijovic, Nikola (2017), ‘Film Review: Personal Shopper,’ Film, Fashion & Consumption 6 (1): 19–23.

    Google Scholar 

  • Mishra, Vijay (1994), The Gothic Sublime, New York: State University of New York Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Moine, Raphaëlle (2007), Remakes: les films français à Hollywood, Paris: CNRS Éditions.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Morey, Anne (2012a), ‘“Famine for Food, Expectation for Content”: Jane Eyre as Precursor to the “Twilight” Saga,’ in Morey (ed.), Genre, Reception and Adaptation in the ‘Twilight’ Series, Farnham: Ashgate, pp. 15–28.

    Google Scholar 

  • ——— (ed.) (2012b), Genre, Reception and Adaptation in the ‘Twilight’ Series, Farnham: Ashgate.

    Google Scholar 

  • ——— (2012c), ‘Introduction,’ in Morey (ed.), Genre, Reception and Adaptation in the ‘Twilight’ Series, Farnham: Ashgate, pp. 1–14.

    Google Scholar 

  • Neale, Steve (1990), ‘Questions of Genre,’ Screen 31 (1): 45–66.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Negra, Diane (2008), ‘Structural Integrity, Historical Reversion, and the Post-9/11 Chick-Flick,’ Feminist Media Studies 8 (1) (March): 51–68.

    Google Scholar 

  • Ngai, Sianne (2007), Ugly Feelings, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Nykvist, Karin (2011), ‘The Body Project,’ in Mariah Larsson and Ann Steiner (eds), Interdisciplinary Approaches to Twilight: Studies in Fiction, Media and a Contemporary Cultural Experience, Lund: Nordic Academic Press, pp. 29–46.

    Google Scholar 

  • Olin-Scheller, Christina (2011), in Mariah Larsson and Anne Steiner (eds), Interdisciplinary Approaches to Twilight: Studies in Fiction, Media and a Contemporary Cultural Experience, Lund: Nordic Academic Press, pp. 159–175.

    Google Scholar 

  • O’Meara, Jennifer (2014), ‘“We’ve Got to Work on Your Accent and Vocabulary”: Characterization through Verbal Style in Clueless,’ Cinema Journal 53 (3) (Spring): 138–145.

    Google Scholar 

  • Osborn, Marijane (2010), ‘Luminous and Liminal: Why Edward Shines,’ in Amy M. Clarke and Marijane Osborn (eds), The Twilight Mystique: Critical Essays on the Novels and Films, Jefferson, NC and London: McFarland and Co., pp. 15–34.

    Google Scholar 

  • Paget, Derek (2011), No Other Way to Tell It: Docudrama on Film and Television, Manchester: Manchester University Press (British Library digital collection).

    Google Scholar 

  • Parke, Maggie and Natalie Wilson (eds) (2011), Theorizing Twilight: Critical Essays on What’s at Stake in a Post-Vampire World, Jefferson, NC and London: McFarland and Co.

    Google Scholar 

  • Parmiter, Tara K. (2011), ‘Green is the New Black: Ecophobia and the Gothic Landscape in the Twilight Series,’ in Giselle Liza Anatole (ed.), Bringing Light to Twilight, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 221–233.

    Google Scholar 

  • Paszkiewicz, Katarzyna (2015), ‘Hollywood Transgressor or Hollywood Transvestite?: The Reception of Kathryn Bigelow’s The Hurt Locker (2008),’ in Christine Gledhill and Julia Knight (eds), Doing Women’s Film History: Reframing Cinemas, Past and Future, Chicago: University of Illinois Press, pp. 166–180.

    Google Scholar 

  • ——— (2018a), Genre, Authorship and Contemporary Women Filmmakers, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • ——— (2018b), ‘When the Woman Directs (a Horror Film),’ in Mary Harrod and Katarzyna Paszkiewicz (eds), Women Do Genre in Film and Television, London and New York: Routledge, pp. 41–56.

    Google Scholar 

  • Perkins, Victor (2005), ‘Where is the World? The Horizon of Events in Movie Fiction,’ in John Gibbs and Douglas Pye, Style and Meaning: Studies in the Detailed Analysis of Film, Manchester: Manchester University Press, pp. 16–41.

    Google Scholar 

  • Petersen, Anne Helen (2012), ‘That Teenage Feeling: Twilight, Fantasy, and Feminist Readers,’ Feminist Media Studies 12 (1): 51–67.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Pettersson, Bo (2012), ‘Beyond Anti-Mimetic Models: A Critique of Unnatural Narratology,’ in Saija Isomaa, Sari Kivitso, Pirjo Lyytikainen, Sanna Nyqvist, Merja Polvinen and Riikka Rossi (eds), Rethinking Mimesis: Concepts and Practices of Literary Representation, Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, pp. 73–92.

    Google Scholar 

  • Pisters, Patricia (2010) ‘Logistics of Perception 2.0: Multiple Screen Aesthetics in Iraq War films,’ Film-Philosophy 14 (1): 232–252.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Potter, Claire (2010), ‘Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell: Gendering War in The Hurt Locker,’ The Chronicle: Blog Network, 20 March 2010. https://www.chronicle.com/blognetwork/tenuredradical/2010/03/dont-ask-dont-tell-hurt-locker-writes/

  • Powrie, Phil (2020), ‘Music in Girlhood,’ Girlhood and Contemporary French Cinema Studies Symposium, King’s College London, 8 February 2020.

    Google Scholar 

  • Radner, Hilary (2010), Neo-Feminist Cinema: Girly Films, Chick Flicks, and Consumer Culture, London and New York: Routledge.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Radway, Janice A. (1991), Reading the Romance: Women, Patriarchy and Popular Literature, Chapel Hill and London: University of North Carolina Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Roberts, Kimberley (2002), ‘The Pleasures and Problems of the “Angry Girl”,’ in Frances Gateward and Murray Pomerance (eds), Sugar, Spice and Everything Nice: Cinemas of Girlhood, Detroit: Wayne State University Press, pp. 217–233.

    Google Scholar 

  • Robinson, Janet S. (2014), ‘The Gendered Geometry of War in Kathryn Bigelow’s The Hurt Locker (2008),’ in Karen A. Ritzenhoff and Jakub Kzecki (eds), Heroism and Gender in War Films, New York: Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 153–170.

    Google Scholar 

  • Ruddell, Caroline (2014), ‘The Lore of the Wild,’ in Wickham Clayton and Sarah Harman (eds), Screening Twilight: Critical Approaches to a Cinematic Phenomenon, London: I. B. Tauris, pp. 74–85.

    Google Scholar 

  • Schatz, Thomas (1981), Hollywood Genres: Formulas, Filmmaking, and the Studio System, Austin: McGraw-Hill.

    Google Scholar 

  • Scheiner, Georganne (2000), Signifying Female Adolescence: Film Representations and Fans, Westport, CT: Praeger.

    Google Scholar 

  • Schreiber, Michele (2014), American Postfeminist Cinema: Women, Romance and Contemporary Culture, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Schwind, Jean (2008), ‘Cool Coaching at Ridgemont High,’ The Journal of Popular Culture 41 (6): 1012–1032.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Sears, Camilla A. and Rebecca Godderis (2011), ‘Roar Like a Tiger on TV?: Constructions of Women and Childbirth in Reality TV,’ Feminist Media Studies 11 (2): 181–195.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Shary, Timothy (2005), Teen Movies: American Youth on Screen, New York and London: Wallflower.

    Google Scholar 

  • ——— (2014), Generation Multiplex: The Image of Youth in American Cinema since 1980, Austin: University of Texas Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Smith, Frances (2017), Rethinking the Hollywood Teen Movie: Genre, Gender and Identity, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Sobchack, Vivian (2004), Carnal Thoughts: Embodiment and Moving Image Culture, Oakland: University of California Press.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Speed, Lesley (1998), ‘Tuesday’s Gone: The Nostalgic Teen Film,’ Journal of Popular Film and Television 26 (1): 24–32.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • ——— (2002), ‘A World Ruled by Hilarity: Gender and Low Comedy in the Films of Amy Heckerling,’ Senses of Cinema 22. http://sensesofcinema.com/2002/filmmaker-profiles/heckerling/

  • ——— (2016), ‘Way Hilarious: Amy Heckerling as a Female Comedy Director, Writer, and Producer,’ in Frances Smith and Timothy Shary (eds), ReFocus: The Films of Amy Heckerling, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Spooner, Catherine (2006), Contemporary Gothic, London: Reaktion Books.

    Google Scholar 

  • Stam, Robert (1999), Film Theory: An Introduction, Oxford: Blackwell.

    Google Scholar 

  • Stern, Lesley (2000), ‘Emma in Los Angeles: Remaking the Book and the City,’ in James Naremore (ed.), Film Adaptation, London: Athlone Press, pp. 221–238.

    Google Scholar 

  • Stewart, Garrett (2009), ‘Digital Fatigue: Imaging War in Recent American Film,’ Film Quarterly 62 (4) (Summer): 45–55.

    Google Scholar 

  • Stewart, Susan (1993), Narratives of the Miniature, the Gigantic, the Souvenir, the Collection, Durham, NC: Duke University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Stolar, Batia Boe (2013), ‘The Politics of Reproduction in Stephanie Meyer’s Twilight Saga,’ in Barbara Brodman and James E. Doan (eds), Images of the Modern Vampire: The Hip and the Atavistic, New Jersey: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press (Ebook).

    Google Scholar 

  • Tally, Margaret (2008), ‘Something’s Gotta Give: Hollywood, Female Sexuality and the “Older Bird” Chick Flick,’ in Suzanne Ferriss and Mallory Young (eds), Chick Flicks: Contemporary Women at the Movies, London and New York: Routledge, pp. 119–131.

    Google Scholar 

  • Tasker, Yvonne and Diane Negra (2007), ‘Introduction,’ in Yvonne Tasker and Diane Negra (eds), Interrogating Postfeminism: Gender and the Politics of Popular Culture, Durham and London: Duke University Press, pp. 1–25.

    Google Scholar 

  • Tasker, Yvonne and Eylem Atakav (2010), ‘The Hurt Locker: Male Intimacy, Violence, and the Iraq War movie,’ Sine/Cine: Journal of Film Studies 1 (2): 57–70.

    Google Scholar 

  • Tenga, Angela (2011), ‘Psychology, Intertextuality, and Hyperreality in the Series,’ in Maggie Parke and Natalie Wilson (eds), Theorizing Twilight: Critical Essays on What’s at Stake in a Post-Vampire World, Jefferson, NC and London: McFarland and Co, pp. 101–116.

    Google Scholar 

  • Thompson, Evan (2007), Mind in Life: Biology, Phenomenology and the Sciences of the Mind, Cambridge, MA and London: Harvard University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Thompson, Lauren Jade (2013), ‘Mancaves and Cushions: Marking Masculine and Feminine Domestic Space in Postfeminist Romantic Comedy,’ in Joel Gwynne and Nadine Muller (eds), Postfeminism and Contemporary Hollywood Cinema, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 149–165.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Tincknell, Estella (2009), ‘Feminine Boundaries: Adolescence, Witchcraft and the Supernatural in New Gothic Cinema and Television,’ in Ian Conrich (ed.), Horror Zone: The Cultural Experience of Contemporary Horror Cinema, London: I. B. Tauris, pp. 245–258.

    Google Scholar 

  • Tiqqun (2012), Preliminary Materials for a Theory of the Young-Girl, trans. Ariana Reines, Cambridge, MITS Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Turim, Maureen (2003), ‘Popular Culture and the Comedy of Manners: Clueless and Fashion Clues,’ in Suzanne R. Pucci and James Thompson (eds), Jane Austen and Co.: Remaking the Past in Contemporary Culture, New York: SUNY Press, pp. 33–52.

    Google Scholar 

  • Verevis, Constantine (2006), Film Remakes, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Virilio, Paul (1992), War and Cinema: The Logistics of Perception, London: Verso.

    Google Scholar 

  • Westwell, Guy (2008), ‘Stop-Loss,’ Sight and Sound 18 (5) (May): 87–88.

    Google Scholar 

  • Wiktorin, Pierre (2011), ‘The Vampire as a Religious Phenomenon,’ in Mariah Larsson and Ann Steiner (eds), Interdisciplinary Approaches to Twilight: Studies in Fiction, Media and a Contemporary Cultural Experience, Lund: Nordic Academic Press, pp. 279–296.

    Google Scholar 

  • Williamson, Milly (2005), The Lure of the Vampire: Gender, Fiction, and Fandom from Bram Stoker to Buffy, London: Wallflower Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Wilson, Natalie (2011), Seduced by Twilight: The Allure and Contradictory Messages of the Popular Saga, Jefferson, NC and London: McFarland and Co.

    Google Scholar 

  • ——— (2014), ‘Foreword,’ in Wickham Clayton and Sarah Harman (eds), Screening Twilight: Critical Approaches to a Cinematic Phenomenon, London: I. B. Tauris, pp. x–xiv.

    Google Scholar 

  • Wood, Robin (2002), ‘Party Time or Can’t Hardly Wait for that American Pie: Hollywood High School Movies of the 90s,’ CineAction! 58: 4–10.

    Google Scholar 

  • ——— (2003), Hollywood: From Vietnam to Reagan… and Beyond, New York: Columbia University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Zanger, Anat (2006), Film Remakes as Ritual and Disguise: From Ripley to Carmen, Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

Websites

Download references

Author information

Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Mary Harrod .

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

Copyright information

© 2021 The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Switzerland AG

About this chapter

Verify currency and authenticity via CrossMark

Cite this chapter

Harrod, M. (2021). Pastiching the Popular. In: Heightened Genre and Women's Filmmaking in Hollywood. Palgrave Macmillan, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-70994-5_3

Download citation