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Efforts to Reduce Justice Reinvolvement: Jail Diversion, Justice Outreach, and Justice Reentry

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Abstract

Homeless persons frequently find themselves interacting with the legal justice system. A clear understanding of such a complex system and the key elements that perpetuate that interaction could help formulate solutions to avoid the so-called revolving door in corrections.

The world of correctional psychiatry has seen great changes over the years. This chapter delineates some of the most notorious changes and explores important concepts for the understanding of the problem that constitutes the incarceration of the mentally ill offender. It describes current trends, nuances, and challenges encountered by the mental health professionals who work with incarcerated people.

By the end of this chapter, the reader will be able to recognize the key players in the correctional justice system, manage the terminology used in correctional psychiatry, and understand the connection (or lack thereof) to their community services by applying these concepts to what they can observe in their jurisdiction. The available opportunities to improve care in corrections are directly related to the conscious decision to get involved and to advocate for changes to the status quo.

Keywords

  • Transinstitutionalization, SMI, Correctional psychiatry, Overcrowding, Incarceration

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Lluberes Rincon, N.G. (2021). Efforts to Reduce Justice Reinvolvement: Jail Diversion, Justice Outreach, and Justice Reentry. In: Ritchie, E.C., Llorente, M.D. (eds) Clinical Management of the Homeless Patient. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-70135-2_18

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