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“Starting from Scratch?”: Adaptation After Deportation and Return Migration Among Young Mexican Migrants

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Stealing Time

Abstract

This chapter examines how young adults adapt to life in Mexico after growing up and attending school in the United States. Experiencing a dramatic increase in immigration enforcement in the United States, the young migrants highlighted in this chapter felt compelled to leave or were deported from the United States. Interruptions in education, work, and, most devastatingly, family life marked their initial returns to Mexico, and continued to affect their opportunities and social embeddedness years later. They all lost precious time, money and autonomy as they adapted to their country of birth.

This material is based upon work supported in part by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship Program under Grant No. (DGE-1650116). Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

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Notes

  1. 1.

    All names are pseudonyms.

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Correspondence to Alexis M. Silver .

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Silver, A.M., Manzanares, M.A., Goldring, L. (2021). “Starting from Scratch?”: Adaptation After Deportation and Return Migration Among Young Mexican Migrants. In: Bhatia, M., Canning, V. (eds) Stealing Time. Palgrave Macmillan, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-69897-3_7

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-69897-3_7

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