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Lip-Syncing for Our Lives: Queering Dissent in Queer & Now a Lip-Sync Spectacular

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Abstract

Through a discussion of theory in practice, this creative piece proposes lip sync as a queer and feminist medium for reading and performing gender. Lip-sync offers performative possibilities of juxtaposition, contradiction, and expansion—making room for trans theories of temporality in practice. Additionally, relying on queer temporality studies, film analysis, and queer and trans theories (Grosz, Edelman, Elliott-Smith, etc.) this creative piece examines the queer and trans feminist questions presented by the performance. Rather than asking how we can make space in drag for trans folx, this paper argues that trans drag performers expand the possibilities of drag altogether.

Keywords

  • Drag
  • Lip-syncing
  • Trans identity
  • Queer community
  • Performance

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  • DOI: 10.1007/978-3-030-69555-2_14
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Lefevre, F. (2021). Lip-Syncing for Our Lives: Queering Dissent in Queer & Now a Lip-Sync Spectacular. In: Rosenberg, T., D'Urso, S., Winget, A.R. (eds) The Palgrave Handbook of Queer and Trans Feminisms in Contemporary Performance. Palgrave Macmillan, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-69555-2_14

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