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Overview of Microbial Contamination of Foods and Associated Risk Factors

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Techniques to Measure Food Safety and Quality

Abstract

Microorganisms like molds, yeasts, bacteria, and viruses can cause food spoilage and foodborne diseases. For the past decade, the increase in foodborne infections has become an important public health concern worldwide. According to a report of the World Health Organization, hundreds of millions of people worldwide suffer from diseases caused by contaminated food. In order to ensure the protection of consumers from detrimental impacts of food microbiological contamination, it is important to improve the understanding and awareness of the sources and to identify the routes of transmission of pathogens into foods. This chapter thus addresses the microbiological contamination of foods including the mechanisms of microbiological contamination, microbial contaminants, and their commonly associated foods. In addition, it discusses the impacts of microbial contaminations and their risk factors associated with foodborne diseases.

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Nowshad, F., Mustari, N., Khan, M.S. (2021). Overview of Microbial Contamination of Foods and Associated Risk Factors. In: Khan, M.S., Shafiur Rahman, M. (eds) Techniques to Measure Food Safety and Quality. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-68636-9_2

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