Skip to main content

Educating Music Teachers for the Future: The Crafts of Change

  • Chapter
  • First Online:
Music Education as Craft

Part of the book series: Landscapes: the Arts, Aesthetics, and Education ((LAAE,volume 30))

Abstract

In light of current global educational reforms and neoliberal discourses, it is timely to ask about the future direction of music education. This chapter discusses the concept of “crafts” in relation to music teacher education, more particularly from a perspective of change. A starting point for this chapter is that the crafts of music teacher education directly concerns the facilitation of development and change, for example, by deliberating on what is important to keep and build on in the professional practice of music teacher education and what is better left out. When deliberating on questions of traditions and change, I suggest that one should take into consideration if and how the educational practices of music teacher education (a) actively reflect on and productively try to contribute to the big challenges of the world; (b) explicitly address systemic bias and inequalities; and (c) provide spaces for student participation and agency.

This is a preview of subscription content, log in via an institution to check access.

Access this chapter

Chapter
USD 29.95
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • Available as PDF
  • Read on any device
  • Instant download
  • Own it forever
eBook
USD 109.00
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • Available as EPUB and PDF
  • Read on any device
  • Instant download
  • Own it forever
Softcover Book
USD 139.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • Compact, lightweight edition
  • Dispatched in 3 to 5 business days
  • Free shipping worldwide - see info
Hardcover Book
USD 159.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • Durable hardcover edition
  • Dispatched in 3 to 5 business days
  • Free shipping worldwide - see info

Tax calculation will be finalised at checkout

Purchases are for personal use only

Institutional subscriptions

Similar content being viewed by others

Notes

  1. 1.

    Aróstegui and Cisneros-Cohernour (2010) claim to find examples of a reasonably balanced relationship between musical content and educational perspectives within European music education (especially in Sweden and Finland), more than in Latin American countries, where there is a particularly strong emphasis on musical content.

  2. 2.

    The Primary and Lower Secondary Education Act (2010).

  3. 3.

    https://lovdata.no/dokument/SF/forskrift/2010-03-01-295?q=L%C3%A6rerutdanning

  4. 4.

    https://lovdata.no/dokument/NL/lov/1998-07-17-61?q=opplæringslov

  5. 5.

    https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/?menu=1300

References

  • Allsup, R. E. (2016). Remixing the classroom. Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Aróstegui, J. L. (2011). Educating music teachers for the 21st century. Rotterdam, the Netherlands: Sense.

    Book  Google Scholar 

  • Aróstegui, J. L., & Cisneros-Cohernour, E. (2010). Reflexiones en torno a la formación del profesorado de música a partir del análisis documental de los planes de estudio en Europa y América Latina. Profesorado: Revista de curriculum y formacion del profesorado, 14(2), 179–189.

    Google Scholar 

  • Biesta, G. (2007). The education-socialization conundrum or “who is afraid of education?”. Utbildning och demokrati, 16(3), 25–36.

    Google Scholar 

  • Biesta, G. (2017). The future of teacher education: Evidence, competence or wisdom? In M. A. Peters, B. Cowie, & I. Menter (Eds.), A companion to research in teacher education (pp. 435–453). Singapore: Springer.

    Chapter  Google Scholar 

  • Bowman, W. (2007). Who is the “we”? Rethinking professionalism in music education. Action, Criticism and Theory for Music Education, 6(4), 109–131.

    Google Scholar 

  • Burnard, P. (2013). Problematizing what counts as knowledge and the production of knowledges in music. In E. Georgii-Hemming, P. Burnard, & S.-E. Holgersen (Eds.), Professional knowledge in music teacher education (pp. 97–108). Surrey, UK: Ashgate.

    Google Scholar 

  • Burner, T. (2018). Why is educational change so difficult and how can we make it more effective. Forskning & Forandring, 1(1), 122–134.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Christophersen, C., & Gullberg, A.-K. (2017). Popular music education, participation and democracy: Some Nordic perspectives. In G. D. Smith, Z. Moir, M. Brennan, P. Kirkman, & S. Rambarran (Eds.), The Routledge research companion to popular music education (pp. 425–437). Abingdon, UK: Routledge.

    Chapter  Google Scholar 

  • Clayton, M. (2016). The social and personal functions of music in cross-cultural perspective. In S. Hallam, I. Cross, & M. Thauth (Eds.), The Oxford handbook of music psychology (pp. 46–59). Oxford, UK/New York: Oxford University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Darling-Hammond, L. (2006). Constructing 21st century teacher education. Journal of Teacher Education, 57(3), 300–314.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Emirbayer, M., & Mische, A. (1998). What is Agency? American Journal of Sociology, 103(4), 962–1023.

    Google Scholar 

  • Fullan, M. (2016). The new meaning of educational change. New York: Routledge.

    Google Scholar 

  • Futrell, M. H. (2010). Transforming teacher education to reform America’s P-20 education system. Journal of Teacher Education, 61(5), 432–440.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Georgii-Hemming, E., & Westvall, M. (2010). Teaching music in our time: Student music teachers’ reflections on music education, teacher education and becoming a teacher. Music Education Research, 12(4), 353–367.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Hess, J. (2018). Equity and music education: Euphemisms, terminal naivety, and Whiteness. Action, Criticism, and Theory for Music Education, 16(3), 15–47.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Jorgensen, E. (2003). Transforming music education. Bloomington: Indiana University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Jorgensen, E. (2007). Concerning justice and music education. Music Education Research, 9(2), 169–189.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Kemmis, S., Wilkinson, J., Edwards-Groves, C., Grootenboer, P., & Bristol, L. (2014). Changing practices, changing education. Singapore: Springer.

    Book  Google Scholar 

  • Kincheloe, J. (2008). Critical pedagogy primer. New York: Peter Lang.

    Book  Google Scholar 

  • Kratus, J. (2015). The role of subversion in changing music education. In C. Randles (Ed.), Music education: Navigating the future (pp. 340–346). New York/London: Routledge.

    Google Scholar 

  • Laes, T., & Westerlund, H. (2018). Performing disability in music teacher education: Moving beyond inclusion through expanded professionalism. International Journal of Music Education, 36(1), 34–36.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Lin Goodwin, A., Smith, L., Souto-Manning, M., Cheruvu, M. Y., Reed, R., & Taveras, L. (2014). What should teacher educators know and be able to do? Perspectives from practicing teacher educators. Journal of Teacher Education, 65(4), 284–302.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Lindgren, M., & Ericsson, C. (2010). The rock band context as discursive governance in music education in Swedish schools. Action Criticism and Theory for Music Education, 9(3), 35–54.

    Google Scholar 

  • Loughran, J. (2014). Professionally developing as a teacher educator. Journal of Teacher Education, 65(4), 271–283.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Moss, P. (2014). Transformative change and real utopias in early childhood education: A story of democracy, experimentation and potentiality. Oxon, UK: Routledge.

    Book  Google Scholar 

  • Osberg, D. (2009). “Enlarging the space of the possible” around what it means to educate and be educated. Complicity: An International Journal of Complexity and Education, 6(1), iii–x.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Pellegrino, K. (2009). Connections between performer and teacher identities in music teachers: Setting and agenda for research. Journal of Music Teacher Education, 19(1), 39–55.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Prest, A. (2013). The corporatization of schooling and its effects on the state of music education: A critical Deweyan perspective. Action, Criticism, and Theory for Music Education, 12(3), 31–44.

    Google Scholar 

  • Priestley, M., Biesta, G., & Robinson, S. (2015). Teacher agency: An ecological approach. London: Bloomsbory.

    Book  Google Scholar 

  • Rusinek, G., & Aróstegui, J. L. (2015). Educational policy reforms and the politics of music teacher education. In C. Benedict, P. Schmidt, G. Spruce, & P. Woodford (Eds.), The Oxford handbook of social justice in music education (pp. 78–90). New York: Oxford University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Sætre, J. H. (2014). Preparing generalist student teachers to teach music. PhD Dissertation, Norwegian Academy of Music, Oslo.

    Google Scholar 

  • Sætre, J. H. (2017). Music teacher education: A matter of preservation or innovation? In R. Girdzijauskiene & M. Stakelum (Eds.), Creativity and innovation: European perspectives on music education 7 (pp. 215–228). Innsbruck, Austria: Helbling.

    Google Scholar 

  • Sahlberg, P. (2016). The global educational reform movement and its impact on schooling. In K. Mundy, A. Green, B. Lingard, & A. Verger (Eds.), The handbook of global education policy (pp. 128–144). New York: John Wiley & Sons.

    Chapter  Google Scholar 

  • Tobin, K. (2009). Tuning into others’ voices: Radical listening, learning from difference, and escaping oppression. Cultural Studies of Science Education, 4(3), 505–511.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Turino, T. (2008). Music as social life: The politics of participation. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Ulvik, M., & Smith, K. (2016). Å undervise om å undervise – Lærerutdanneres kompetanse sett fra deres egen og fra lærerstudenters perspektiv. Uniped, 36(1), 61–77.

    Google Scholar 

  • Väkevä, L., Westerlund, H., & Ilmola-Sheppard, L. (2017). Social innovations in music education: Creating institutional resilience for increasing social justice. Action, Criticism, and Theory for Music Education, 16(3), 129–147.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Vaugeois, L. C. (2013). Colonization and the institutionalization of hierarchies of the human through music education: Studies in the education of feeling. PhD Dissertation, University of Toronto.

    Google Scholar 

  • Westerlund, H. (2006). Garage rock bands: A future model for developing expertise. International Journal of Music Education, 24(2), 119–125.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Westerlund, H., & Karlsen, S. (2017). Knowledge production beyond local and national blindspots: Remedying professional ocularcentrism of diversity in music teacher education. Action, Criticism and Theory for Music Education, 16(3), 78–107.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Wright, E. O. (2007). Guidelines of envisioning real utopias. In S. Davidson & J. Rutherford (Eds.), Soundings 36: Politics and market. London: Lawrence & Wishart.

    Google Scholar 

  • Wright, R. (2019). Envisioning real Utopias in music education: Prospects, possibilities and impediments. Music Education Research, 21(3), 217–227.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Zeichner, K. (2005). Becoming a teacher educator: A personal perspective. Teaching and Teacher Education, 21(2), 117–124.

    Article  Google Scholar 

Download references

Acknowledgement

This work was supported by the Norwegian Research Council and developed within the research project “Music Teacher Education for the Future” (FUTURED 2019–2022).

Author information

Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Catharina Christophersen .

Editor information

Editors and Affiliations

Rights and permissions

Reprints and permissions

Copyright information

© 2021 Springer Nature Switzerland AG

About this chapter

Check for updates. Verify currency and authenticity via CrossMark

Cite this chapter

Christophersen, C. (2021). Educating Music Teachers for the Future: The Crafts of Change. In: Holdhus, K., Murphy, R., Espeland, M.I. (eds) Music Education as Craft. Landscapes: the Arts, Aesthetics, and Education, vol 30. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-67704-6_6

Download citation

  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-67704-6_6

  • Published:

  • Publisher Name: Springer, Cham

  • Print ISBN: 978-3-030-67703-9

  • Online ISBN: 978-3-030-67704-6

  • eBook Packages: EducationEducation (R0)

Publish with us

Policies and ethics