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Automotive Software Development

Abstract

In this chapter we describe and elaborate on software development processes in the automotive industry. We introduce the V-model for the entire vehicle development and we continue to introduce modern, agile software development methods for describing the ways of working of software development teams. We start by describing the beginning of all software development—requirements engineering—and we describe how requirements are perceived in automotive software development using text and different types of models. We discuss the specifics of automotive software development such as variant management, different integration stages of software development, testing strategies and the methods used for these. We review methods used in practice and explain how they should be used. We conclude the chapter with discussion on the need for standardization as the automotive software development is based on client-supplier relationships between the OEMs and the suppliers developing components of vehicles.

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Staron, M. (2021). Automotive Software Development. In: Automotive Software Architectures. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-65939-4_4

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-65939-4_4

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