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Understanding Cinematography Technology

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Towards a Philosophy of Cinematography
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Abstract

This chapter furthers a new-materialist discussion of lighting by defining an approach to technology that can enable a comprehensive understanding of the relationship between a practitioner and their equipment during moving image production. The chapter argues that technology in relation to these moving image phenomena should be read as an umbrella term—a domain within which specific equipment, tools and processes transform through use. This perspective affords a principled discussion of the increasingly diverse landscape of production and exhibition tools which supports the book’s wider investigation by considering some of the ways that production tools are implicated in lighting practices. To reconcile varying theoretical approaches, the work of Michel Callon, Bruno Latour and John Law is employed as a lens for studying technology. Situating the practitioner in the midst of an entangled network of forces, this chapter recognises the complex web of agency spreading across human and non-human actants which, as a whole, defines moving image practices.

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Nevill, A. (2021). Understanding Cinematography Technology. In: Towards a Philosophy of Cinematography . Palgrave Macmillan, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-65935-6_3

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