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Network Analytics of Collaborative Problem-Solving

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Balancing the Tension between Digital Technologies and Learning Sciences

Abstract

Problem-solving and collaboration are regarded as an essential part of twenty-first century skills. This study describes a task-focused approach to network analysis of trace data from collaborative problem-solving in a digital learning environment. The analysis framework builds and expands upon previous analyses of social ties as well as discourse analysis and adds new metrics of collaborative learning, problem-solving and personal learning. Using three forms of evidence—actions and use of resources, communications and constructed products—the article outlines and illustrates a framework for characterising individual and team performance on a team project as a basis for documenting individual and team behaviours linked to personal learning, collaboration and team problem solving. This study provides a preliminary demonstration of the effectiveness of network analysis on quantifying and visualising individual-level and group-level performance in computer-mediated collaborative learning.

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Acknowledgements

This research is supported by Curtin University’s UNESCO Chair of Data Science in Higher Education Learning and Teaching (https://research.curtin.edu.au/unesco/). The research team wishes to thank Gabrielle Joliffe of Mount Lawley High School in Perth, for her invaluable insights as a classroom teacher and challenge content author.

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Correspondence to Dirk Ifenthaler .

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Kerrigan, S., Feng, S., Vuthaluru, R., Ifenthaler, D., Gibson, D. (2021). Network Analytics of Collaborative Problem-Solving. In: Ifenthaler, D., Sampson, D.G., Isaías, P. (eds) Balancing the Tension between Digital Technologies and Learning Sciences. Cognition and Exploratory Learning in the Digital Age. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-65657-7_4

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-65657-7_4

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