Skip to main content

Queering Indigenous Land-Based Education

Part of the International Explorations in Outdoor and Environmental Education book series (IEOEE)

Abstract

Over the past decade, land-based education has become increasingly popular across First Nations and other school systems in Canada. The shift from classroom-based teaching to land-based approaches has supported Indigenous cultural revitalization. It has also provided an opportunity for educators to “queer” both pedagogy and essentialist understandings of nature and cosmology. This chapter focuses on the philosophical and pedagogical praxis of queering land-based education, learning from our experiences designing and teaching the graduate level course Queering Indigenous Land-Based Education. We focus on aspects of the course that demonstrate the importance of our relationships with water, land, and place in relation to the process of disrupting and reorienting our education and knowledge systems. These themes are presented alongside students’ (K-12 teachers or administrators) reflections on the course’s impacts on their own practice as land-based educators.

Keywords

  • Land-based education
  • Queering education
  • Indigenous education

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

Buying options

Chapter
USD   29.95
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • DOI: 10.1007/978-3-030-65368-2_11
  • Chapter length: 13 pages
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
  • Exclusive offer for individuals only
  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
eBook
USD   109.00
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • ISBN: 978-3-030-65368-2
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
  • Exclusive offer for individuals only
  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
Softcover Book
USD   149.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
Hardcover Book
USD   149.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
Fig. 11.1
Fig. 11.2

Notes

  1. 1.

    Story shared with permission.

  2. 2.

    In this discussion, the concept of land encompasses the land itself, the waters, the air, the plants, animals, forces and other beings that, in their reciprocal relationships, form and sustain all life.

  3. 3.

    Ecopedagogy, influenced by Freire, is a revolutionary teaching and learning movement that “opposes the globalization of neoliberalism and imperialism … and attempts to foment collective ecoliteracy and realize culturally relevant forms of knowledge grounded in normative concepts such as sustainability, planetarity, and biophilia ” (Kahn 2010, p. 18, cited in Pollocks 2010).

  4. 4.

    Sara Loutitt, Cree/Metis, is an instructor at Keyano College. She completed her MEd with a concentration in Indigenous land-based education in 2018.

  5. 5.

    Giiwedinong Aanang Richelle Scott, Anishnaabe, is a teacher in Winnipeg, MB. She graduated with an MEd with a concentration Indigenous land-based education in 2018.

References

  • Ahenakew, C. (2016, Fall). Grafting indigenous ways of knowing onto non-indigenous ways of being: The (understimated) challenges of a decolonial imagination. International Review of Qualitative Research, 9(3), 323–340.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Cajete, G. A. (2015). Indigenous community: Rekindling the teachings of the seventh fire. St. Paul: Living Justice Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Chen, M. Y. (2012). Animacies: Biopolitics, racial mattering, and queer affect. Durham: Duke University Press.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • College of Education. (n.d.). Educational foundations: Land-based indigenous focus. Retrieved from University of Saskatchewan https://education.usask.ca/students/graduate/efdt-cohorts/land-based-indigenous-cohort.php#CourseOfferingsandSchedule

  • Denetdale, J. N. (2006, Spring). Chairmen, presidents, and princesses: The Navajo Nation, gender, and the politics of tradition. Wicazo Sa Review, 21(1), 9–28.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Gómez-Peña, G., & Sifuentes, R. (2011). Exercises for rebel artists: Radical performance pedagogy. New York: Routledge.

    Google Scholar 

  • Gómez-Peña, G., & Wolford, L. (2002). Navigating the minefields of utopia: A conversation. TDR, 46(2), 66–96.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Grande, S. (2004). Red pedagogy: Native American social and political thought (Aboriginal Education Collection). Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield.

    Google Scholar 

  • Hall, B. L., & Tandon, R. (2017). Decolonization of knowledge, epistemicide, participatory research and higher education. Research for All, 1(1), 6–19.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Halperin, D. M. (2003). The normalization of queer theory. Journal of Homosexuality, 45(2–4), 339–343.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Hunt, S., & Holmes, C. (2015). Everyday decolonization: Living a decolonizing queer politics. Journal of Lesbian Studies, 19(2), 154–172.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Kahn, R. (2010). Critical pedagogy, ecoliteracy, & planetary crises: The ecopedagogy movement. New York: Peter Lang.

    Google Scholar 

  • La Pocha Nostra. (2014). Pan-indigenous (anti) manifesto 3.4: Co-creating a new performance declaration for the Americas. Retrieved from Hemispheric Institute. https://hemisphericinstitute.org/en/enc14-workshops/item/2484-enc14-workshops-pan-indigenous-manifesto.html

  • Muñoz, J. E. (2009). Cruising utopia: The then and there of queer futurity. New York: New York University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Nicholls, R. (2013). Que(e)rying my teacher identity. Journal of LGBT Youth, 10(4), 388–393.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Pollock, B. (2010, May 9). Review of critical pedagogy, ecoliteracy, & planetary crises: The ecopedagogy mobement by Richard Kahn. The Journal of Sustainability Education.

    Google Scholar 

  • Rasmussen, M., & Allen, L. (2014). What can a concept do? Rethinking education’s queer assemblages. Discourse: Studies in the Cultural Politics of Education, 35(3), 433–443.

    Google Scholar 

  • Russell, J. (2013). Whose better? [re]Orientating a queer ecopedagogy. Canadian Journal of Environmental Education, 18, 11–26.

    Google Scholar 

  • Simpson, L. B. (2014). Land as pedagogy: Nishnaabeg intelligence and rebellious transformation. Decolonization, Indigeneity, Education & Society, 3(3), 1–25.

    Google Scholar 

  • Simpson, L. B. (2017). As we have always done: Indigenous freedom through radical resistance. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Tallbear, K. (2011, November 18). Why interspecies thinking needs indigenous standpoints. Retrieved from Society for Cultural Anthropology: https://culanth.org/fieldsights/why-interspecies-thinking-needs-indigenous-standpoints

  • Tuck, E., & McKenzie, M. (2015). Place in research: Theory, methodology, and methods. New York: Routledge.

    Google Scholar 

  • Wildcat, M., McDonald, M., Irlbacher-Fox, S., & Coulthard, G. (2014). Learning from the land: Indigenous land based pedagogy and decolonization. Decolonization, Indigeneity, Education & Society, 3(3), i–xv.

    Google Scholar 

  • Wilson, S. (2001). Self-as-relationship in indigenous research. Canadian Journal of Native Education, 25(2), 91–92.

    Google Scholar 

  • Wilson, A. (2015). Our coming in stories: Cree identity, body sovereignty and gender self-determination. Retrieved from Journal of Global Indigeneity. https://ro.uow.edu.au/jgi/vol1/iss1/4/

  • Wilson, A. (2018). Skirting the issues: Indigenous myths, misses, and misogyny. In K. Anderson, M. Campbell, & C. Belcourt (Eds.), Keetaahnak/our missing and murdered Indigenous sisters. Edmonton: University of Alberta.

    Google Scholar 

  • Wilson, A., & Laing, M. (2019). Queering indigenous education. In L. T. smith, E. Tuck, & K. W. Yang, indigenous and decolonizing studies in education: Mapping the long view. New York: Routledge.

    Google Scholar 

  • Wilson, S., & Wilson, P. (1998). Relational accountability to all our relations. Canadian Journal of Native Education, 22(1), 155–158.

    Google Scholar 

  • Wilson, S., & Wilson, P. (1999). Taking responsibility: What follows relational accountability? Canadian Journal of Native Education, 23(2), 137–138.

    Google Scholar 

Download references

Author information

Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Alex Wilson .

Editor information

Editors and Affiliations

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

Copyright information

© 2021 Springer Nature Switzerland AG

About this chapter

Verify currency and authenticity via CrossMark

Cite this chapter

Wilson, A., Murray, J., Loutitt, S., Scott, R.N.S. (2021). Queering Indigenous Land-Based Education. In: Russell, J. (eds) Queer Ecopedagogies. International Explorations in Outdoor and Environmental Education. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-65368-2_11

Download citation

  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-65368-2_11

  • Published:

  • Publisher Name: Springer, Cham

  • Print ISBN: 978-3-030-65367-5

  • Online ISBN: 978-3-030-65368-2

  • eBook Packages: EducationEducation (R0)