Skip to main content

The Pluriversity for Stuck Humxns: A Queer EcoPedagogy & Decolonial School

Part of the International Explorations in Outdoor and Environmental Education book series (IEOEE)

Abstract

The Pluriversity for stuck humxns is an exploratory dialogue between early career researchers and established researchers. It responds to the concern that dominant forms of knowledge production are not assisting us to move towards life affirming ways of being and that alternatives are possible. The production of this chapter is one of many new acts towards realising other modes of being and becoming unstuck in scholar activist practice. The chapter begins with an invitation in the form of a poem by Lena Weber, and the resulting text is a response to the poem from multiple contributors from around the world, who imagine transgressive and progressive ‘departments’ of the Pluriversity. Situated amongst the impulses of queer ecopedagogy and drawing on imagination to understand and play with multiple (or diverse) knowledges, the authors explore what nurturing institutions for scholarly training and life may look like, and what might be possible and in fact are possible through our collaborative experience in the act of creating the Pluriversity for stuck humxns. Itself an intersectional being, this chapter is a queer inquiry dedicated to challenging and reframing norms and dogma and to shake up the boundaries of categories and narrowly and often dogmatically employed concepts. The authors break open pedagogy in ways that allowed them to question research practice and instead conceive of a ‘research worthy of their longing’.

Keywords

  • Transgressive learning
  • Scholar activism
  • Researcher learning
  • Reflexivity
  • Imaginative enquiry
  • Ecopedagogy
  • Cognitive justice
  • Pluriverse
  • Radical imagination

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

Buying options

Chapter
USD   29.95
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • DOI: 10.1007/978-3-030-65368-2_10
  • Chapter length: 36 pages
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
  • Exclusive offer for individuals only
  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
eBook
USD   109.00
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • ISBN: 978-3-030-65368-2
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
  • Exclusive offer for individuals only
  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
Softcover Book
USD   149.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
Hardcover Book
USD   149.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
Fig. 10.1
Fig. 10.2
Fig. 10.3
Fig. 10.4

Notes

  1. 1.

    The Transformations community brings together a growing network of researchers and practitioners who work towards social transformations in sustainability contexts. See https://transformationstosustainability.org/

  2. 2.

    www.transgressivelearning.org

  3. 3.

    https://steps-centre.org/project/pathways-network/

  4. 4.

    www.acknowlej.org

  5. 5.

    The range of work by contributing authors spans: political ecologies of climate change and environmental movements (Scheidel et al. 2018; Temper et al. 2018; Temper 2019), environmental policy alternatives and justice movements (Broome et al. n.d.; Bajpai 2019), higher education and public pedagogy (Lotz-Sisitka 2019), environmental education and critical pedagogy (James 2019), environmental education and arts-based research (Van Borek and James 1964), water access policies and resistance (Pereira and Wilson 2012), Transformative ocean governance from a social justice perspective : (Morgera et al. 2019), systems research and agriculture (Metelerkamp et al. 2019), researcher reflexivity and transgressive learning (Temper et al. 2019), Action research and transformations to sustainability (Macintyre 2019; Macintyre et al. 2019), transgressive learning epistemologies (Bengtsson 2019), bringing together environmental law and the anthropocene (Vermeylen 2017), climate change and (Moser 2020), socio-ecological transformation and stewardship (Cockburn et al. 2018; Eakin et al. 2019), possibilities for peace amidst extreme violence (Kuany 2017).

  6. 6.

    Rebecca Martusewicz (2009: 254) refers to the concept of ‘collaborative intelligence’, which she borrows from Susan Griffin (1996): “…intelligence , even knowledge, is not born of the human capacity to think or make sense of the world alone, but rather it is the result of a collaborative endeavor among human and the more-than-human world. In this sense, as human communities are nested within a larger ecological system, we participate in and are affected by a complex exchange of information and sense-making that contributes to the well-being of that system.”

  7. 7.

    Widely practiced in South African Primary Schools in the early 1990s

  8. 8.

    (Among the Dinka) A clay made pebble game played under the Lang or Thau trees by the elders to pass time and philosophize.

  9. 9.

    https://onbeing.org/programs/robin-wall-kimmerer-the-intelligence-in-all-kinds-of-life/

  10. 10.

    Huun Huur Tur, https://huunhuurtu.wordpress.com/

  11. 11.

    Tamikrest, Kidal, http://www.tamikrest.net/

  12. 12.

    Ali Farka Toures, Niafunke, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xCoSiT57c0E

  13. 13.

    Palestinian orchestra uses ‘music as resistance ’. https://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/features/2017/09/palestinian-orchestra-music-resistance-170904120451727.html

  14. 14.

    Rebel Music: The Tuareg Uprising in 12 Songs by Tinariwen. https://www.newyorker.com/culture/culture-desk/rebel-music-the-tuareg-uprising-in-12-songs-by-tinariwen

References

  • Ahmed, S. (2015). The cultural politics of emotion (Second). New York: Edinburgh University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Akomolafe, B. (2017). The edges in the middle. Totnes: Schumacher College.

    Google Scholar 

  • Bajpai, S. (2019). Resistance is fertile – The emerging alternative political discourse in the Indian Parliamentary elections. 19 May 2019: Radical ecological democracy: Searching for alternatives to unsustainable and inequitable model of “development.” Retrieved from https://www.radicalecologicaldemocracy.org/indian-parliamentary-elections-2019-searching-for-an-alternative-political-discourse/

  • Bengtsson, S. (2019). Engaging with the beyond – Diffracting conceptions of T-learning. Sustainability, 11, 3430.

    Google Scholar 

  • Bhaskar, R. (2008). Dialectic: The pulse of freedom. Journal of Chemical Information and Modeling (53). New York: Routledge. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781107415324.004

  • Bleek, W., & Lloyd, L. (2000). The girl who made stars: And other bushman stories. Daimon Publishers.

    Google Scholar 

  • Boidin, C., Cohen, J., & Grosfoguel, R. (2012). Decolonizing the university, practicing Pluriversity. HUman Architecture, X(1).

    Google Scholar 

  • Boler, M. (1999). Feeling power. New York: Routledge.

    Google Scholar 

  • Broome, N. P., Ajit, S., & Tatpati. (n.d.). The Indian Forest Act’s proposed amendment is dangerous and fanciful. TownToEarth. Retrieved from https://www.downtoearth.org.in/blog/forests/the-indian-forest-act-s-proposed-amendment-is-dangerous-and-fanciful-64319

  • Butler, J. (2017). Academic freedom and the critical task of the university. Globalizations, 14(6), 857–861.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Chaves, M., Macintyre, T., Verschoor, G., & Wals, A. E. J. (2017). Towards transgressive learning through ontological politics: Answering the “call of the mountain” in a Colombian network of sustainability. Sustainability (Switzerland), 9(1). https://doi.org/10.3390/su9010021.

  • Chaves, M., Macintyre, T., Vershoor, G., & Wals, A. E. J. (2018). Radical ruralities in practice: Negotiating buen vivir in a Colombian network of sustainability. Journal of Rural Studies, 59, 153–162. Retrieved from https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0743016717301250.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Clandestine Insurgent Rebel Clown Army. (2012). Clandestine insurgent rebel clown army manifesto. Tactical media files. Retrieved from http://www.tacticalmediafiles.net/articles/3546/Clandestine-Insurgent-Rebel-Clown-Army-Manifesto;jsessionid=FCDD12E6ED0C39345D7ED7FE1B95F2A7

  • Clover, D. E. (2012). Feminist artists and popular education: The creative turn. In L. Manicom & S. Walters (Eds.), Feminist popular education in transnational debates: Building pedagogies of possibility (pp. 193–208). New York: Palgrave MacMillan.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Cockburn, J., Cundill, G., Shackleton, S., & Rouget, M. (2018). Towards place-based research to support socio-ecological stewardship. Sustainability, 10, 1434.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Cullinan, C. (2011). Wild law: A manifesto for earth justice (Second). Cornwall: TJ International.

    Google Scholar 

  • de Sousa Santos, B. (2007). Beyond abyssal thinking: From global lines to ecologies of knowledges. Review (Fernand Braudel Center), 30(1), 45–89.

    Google Scholar 

  • de Sousa Santos, B. (2009). A non-occidentalist West?: Learned ignorance and ecology of knowledge. Theory, Culture & Society, 26(8), 103–125. https://doi.org/10.1177/0263276409348079.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • de Sousa Santos, B. (2014). Epistemologies of the South: Justice against epistemicide. Oxon: Routledge.

    Google Scholar 

  • Deecke, V. B. (2018). Dolphins and whales–taking cognitive research out of the tanks and into the wild. In N. Bueno-Guerra & F. Amici (Eds.), Field and laboratory methods in animal cognition: A comparative guide (p. 146). Leipzig: Cambridge University Press.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Demaria, F., & Kothari, A. (2017). The post-development dictionary agenda: Paths to the pluriverse. Third World Quarterly, 38(12), 2588–2599.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Dickens, C. (1987). A tale of two cities. New York: Chelsea House Publishers.

    Google Scholar 

  • Eakin, H., Shelton, R. E., Siqueiros-Garcia, J. M., Charli-Joseph, L., & Manuel-Navarrete, D. (2019). Loss and social-ecological transformation. Ecology and Society, 24(3).

    Google Scholar 

  • Ellingson, L. (2009). Engaging crystallization in qualitative research: An introduction. Thousand Oaks: Sage.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Englund, T. (1986). Curriculum as a political problem: Changing educational conceptions, with special reference to citizenship education. Upsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis.

    Google Scholar 

  • Escobar, A. (2011). Sustainability: Design for the pluriverse. Development, 54(2), 137–140.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Ferreira, B. (2002). Stimmung Bei Heidegger: Das Phänomen Der Stimmung Im Kontext von Heideggers Existenzialanalyse Des Daseins. Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Fitzpatrick, P. (1992). The mythology of modern law. London/New York: Routledge.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Freire, P. (1970). Pedagogy of the oppressed. New York: The Continuum International Publishing Group Inc..

    Google Scholar 

  • Gablik, S. (1992). Connective aesthetics. American Art, 6(2), 2–7.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Gell, A. (1998). Art and agency: An anthropological theory. New York: Oxford University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Gibran, K. (2016). The prophet. Pan Macmillan.

    Google Scholar 

  • Gibson, A. (2015). “Royal Heart” in pansy. Write Bloody Publishing.

    Google Scholar 

  • González-Gaudiano, E. (2005). Education for sustainable development: Configuration and meaning. Policy Futures in Education, 3(3), 243–250. https://doi.org/10.2304/pfie.2005.3.3.2.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Gough, N., Gough, A., Appelbaum, P., Appelbaum, S., Doll, M. A., & Sellers, W. (2003). Tales from camp wilde: Queer (y) ing environmental education research. Canadian Journal of Environmental Education (CJEE), 8(1), 44–66. https://doi.org/10.1590/S0104-026X2011000100017.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Gramsci, A. (1971). Selections from the prison notebooks. The civil society reader. Lawrence & Wishart. https://doi.org/10.2307/479844.

  • Griffin, S. (1996). The Eros of everyday life: Essays on ecology, gender and society. New York: Doubleday.

    Google Scholar 

  • Haluza-delay, R. (2013). Educating for environmental justice. In R. B. Stevenson, M. Brody, J. Dillon, & A. Wals (Eds.), International handbook of research on environmental education (pp. 394–403). New York: Routledge.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Haraway, D. (2016). Staying with the trouble: Making kin in the Chthulucene. Durham/London: Duke University Press.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Harding, D. J. (2006). Animate earth: Science, intuition and Gaia. Devon: Green Books.

    Google Scholar 

  • Hassan, S. (2018). Silence is a lonely country: A prayer in twelve parts. Longreads, 13 July 2018. Retrieved from https://longreads.com/2018/07/13/silence-is-a-lonely-country-a-prayer-in-twelve-parts/

  • James, A. (2019). Making (non)sense of urban water flows: Qualities and processes for transformative and transgressive learning moments. Sustainability (Switzerland), 11(23). https://doi.org/10.3390/su11236817.

  • Jickling, B. (1992). Why I don’t want my children to be educated for sustainable development. Journal of Environmental Education, 23(4).

    Google Scholar 

  • Jones, R. G. (2010). Putting privilege into practice through “intersectional reflexivity” ruminations, interventions, and possibilities. Reflections: Narratives of Professional Helping, 3(January) Retrieved from http://thekeep.eiu.edu/commstudies_fac/3.

  • Jung, C. G. (2001). On the nature of the psyche. London: Routledge.

    Google Scholar 

  • Kahn, R. (2010). Critical pedagogy, ecoliteracy, and planetary crisis: The ecopedagogy movement.

    Google Scholar 

  • Kellner, D., & Kneller, G. F. (2010). Afterword: Mediating critical pedagogy and critical theory: Richard Kahn’s ecopedagogy. Counterpoints, 359, 151–154.

    Google Scholar 

  • Kothari, A., Salleh, A., Escobar, A., Demaria, F., & Acosta, A. (2018). Pluriverse: A post-development dictionary (A. Kothari, A. Salleh, A. Escobar, F. Demaria, & A. Acosta, Eds.). New Delhi: Tulika Books.

    Google Scholar 

  • Kuany, K. K. (2017). Enlightened darkness: Based on a true story. AFrica World Books.

    Google Scholar 

  • Kulundu, I. (2018). Think piece: Intersectional resonance and the multiplicity of being in a polarised world. Southern African Journal of Environmental Education, 34(0). https://doi.org/10.4314/sajee.v34i1.8.

  • Lorde, A. (1981). The uses of anger: Women responding to racism. In Sister outsider: Essays and speeches (pp. 124–133). Berkley: Crossing Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Lotz-Sisitka, H. (2019). The stinking ontology of Sh#t in the water: Higher education public pedagogy and “Existance”? Sustainability: Journal of Record, 12(2), 83–87.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Lotz-Sisitka, H., Wals, A. E. J., Kronlid, D., & McGarry, D. (2015). Transformative, transgressive social learning: Rethinking higher education pedagogy in times of systemic global dysfunction. Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability, 16, 73–80. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cosust.2015.07.018.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Lotz-Sisitka, H., Belay, M. A., Mphepo, G., Chaves, M., Macintyre, T., Pesanayi, T., McGarry, D. (2016). Co-designing research on transgressive learning in times of climate change. Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability, 20, 50–55. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cosust.2016.04.004.

  • Macintyre, T. (2019). The transgressive gardener: Cultivating learner-based transformations towards regenerative futures. Wageningen University.

    Google Scholar 

  • Macintyre, T., Monroy, T., Coral, D., Zethelius, M., Tassone, V., & Wals, A. E. (2019). T-labs and climate change narratives: Co-researcher qualities in transgressive action–research. Action Research, 17(1), 63–86.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Macy, J., & Young, B. M. (1998). Coming back to life: Practices to reconnect our lives our world. Gabriola Island: New Society Publishers.

    Google Scholar 

  • Martusewicz, R. A. (2009). Educating for “collaborative intelligence”: Revitilizing the cultural and ecological commons of detroit. In M. McKenzie, P. Hart, H. Bai, & B. Jickling (Eds.), Fields of green: Restorying culture, environment and education. Hampton Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • McGarry, D. (2013). Empathy in the time of ecological apartheid: Social sculpture practice-led inquiry into developing pedagogies for ecological citizenship. PhD thesis, Rhodes university.

    Google Scholar 

  • McGarry, D. (2014). Empathetic apprentice: Pedagogical developments in aesthetic education of the social learning practitioner in South Africa. In P. B. Corcoran, B. P. Hollingshead, H. Lotz-Sisitka, & A. E. J. Wals (Eds.), Intergenerational learning and transformative leadership for sustainable futures (pp. 189–200). Wageningen: Wageningen Academic Publishers.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • McGarry, D. (2015). The listening train: A collaborative, connective aesthetics approach to transgressive social learning. Southern African Journal of Environmental Education, 31(1), 8–21–21.

    Google Scholar 

  • McIntosh, P. (1988). White privilege. Theater. https://doi.org/10.1215/01610775-7084669.

  • Metelerkamp, L., Drimie, S., & Biggs, R. (2019). We’re ready, the system’s not–youth perspectives on agricultural careers in South Africa. Agrekon, 58(2), 154–179.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Morgera, E., Pitt, J., McGarry, D., & Hoareau, K. (2019). The one ocean hub: Transforming ocean governance. Seychelles Research Journal, 1(2), 146–148.

    Google Scholar 

  • Morton, T. (2012). Guilt, shame, sadness: Tuning to coexistence. Columbia Graduate School of Achitecture, Preservation, and Planning, 31, 16–18.

    Google Scholar 

  • Moser, S. C. (2020). The work after “It’s too late”(to prevent dangerous climate change). Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Climate Change, 11(1), e606.

    Google Scholar 

  • Okri, B. (1997). A way of being free. Pheonix House.

    Google Scholar 

  • Oliver, M. (1994). White pine. In Poems and prose poems. Houghton: Mifflin Harcourt.

    Google Scholar 

  • Pereira, T., & Wilson, J. (2012). Water demand management’s shadow side: Tackling inequality and scarcity of water provision in Cape Town. Cape Town. Retrieved from http://www.emg.org.za/images/downloads/water_cl_ch/wdmsshadowside.pdf

  • Russell, J. (2013). Whose better? (re) orientating a queer ecopedagogy. Canadian Journal of Environmental Education, 18(May 2011), 11–26.

    Google Scholar 

  • Sacks, S. (2011). Social sculpture and new organs of perception: New practices and new pedagogy for a humane and ecologically visible future. In C. M. Lern Hayes & V. Walters (Eds.), Beuysian legacies in Ireland and beyond: Art culture and politics. Berlin: Lit Verlag.

    Google Scholar 

  • Scharmer, C. O., & Kaufer, K. (2013). Leading from the emerging future: From ego-system to eco-system economies. San Francisco: Berrett-Koehler Publishers.

    Google Scholar 

  • Scheidel, A., Temper, L., Demaria, F., & Martínez, J. (2018). Ecological distribution conflicts as forces for sustainability: An overview and conceptual framework. Sustainability Science, 13(3), 585–598. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11625-017-0519-0.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Sharp, G. (1973). The politics of nonviolent action. Boston: P. Sargent Publisher.

    Google Scholar 

  • Shiva, V. (1988). Staying alive: Women, ecology and survival in India. Community practitioner: The journal of the community practitioners’ & health visitors’ association. New Delhi: Zed Books. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.it.2011.09.001.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Shiva, V. (1993). Monocultures of the mind: Perspectives on biodiversity and biotechnology. New York: Zed Books Ltc.

    Google Scholar 

  • Simons, L. A., Simons, J., McCallum, J., & Friedlander, Y. (2006). Lifestyle factors and risk of dementia: Dubbo Study of the elderly. The Medical Journal of Australia, 184(2), 68–70.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Steiner, R. (1964). The philosophy of freedom. The basis for a modern world conception. Berlin: The Rudolf Steiner Press. Retrieved from Philosophy Ethics.

    Google Scholar 

  • Temper, L. (2019). From boomerangs to minefields and catapults: Dynamics of trans-local resistance to land-grabs. The Journal of Peasant Studies, 46(1), 188–216.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Temper, L., Walter, M., Rodriguez, I., Kothari, A., & Turhan, E. (2018). A perspective on radical transformations to sustainability: Resistances, movements, alternatives. Sustainability Science, 13(3), 747–764.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Temper, L., Mcgarry, D., & Weber, L. (2019). From academic to political rigour: Insights from the ‘Tarot’ of transgressive research. Ecological Economcs, 164, 1–21.

    Google Scholar 

  • Van Borek, S., & James, A. (1964). (Toward) sound research practice: Podcast-building as modelling relational sensibilities at the water-climate change nexus in Cape Town. Arts in Society Magazine, 14(1), 239–242.

    Google Scholar 

  • Van Den Berg, A. E., & Custers, M. H. G. (2011). Gardening promotes neuroendocrine and affective restoration from stress. Journal of Health Psychology, 16(1), 3–11.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Vermeylen, S. (2017). Materiality and the ontological turn in the anthropocene: Establishing a dialogue between law, anthropology and eco-philosophy. In L. Kotze (Ed.), Environmental law and governance for the Anthropocene (pp. 137–162). Oxford: Bloomsbury.

    Google Scholar 

  • Voigt, C. (1982). Dicey’s song. London: Fontana Lions, William Collins & Sons Ltd..

    Google Scholar 

  • Von Kotze, A. (2009). Chasing the vultures off the roof: Education for living. In P. Willis, S. McKenzie, & R. Harris (Eds.), Rethinking work and learning. Adult and vocational education for social sustainability (pp. 1–9). Bonn: UNESCO-UNEVOC & Springer.

    Google Scholar 

  • Waddell, S. (2016). Change for the audacious: A Doer’s guide. Boston: NetworkingAction Publishing.

    Google Scholar 

  • Wahl, D. (2016). Designing regenerative cultures. Axminster: Triarchy Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Wertheim, M. (2009). TED TALK: The beautiful math of coral. Retrieved February 17, 2020, from https://www.ted.com/talks/margaret_wertheim_crochets_the_coral_reef?language=en

Download references

Author information

Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Dylan McGarry .

Editor information

Editors and Affiliations

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

Copyright information

© 2021 Springer Nature Switzerland AG

About this chapter

Verify currency and authenticity via CrossMark

Cite this chapter

McGarry, D. et al. (2021). The Pluriversity for Stuck Humxns: A Queer EcoPedagogy & Decolonial School. In: Russell, J. (eds) Queer Ecopedagogies. International Explorations in Outdoor and Environmental Education. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-65368-2_10

Download citation

  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-65368-2_10

  • Published:

  • Publisher Name: Springer, Cham

  • Print ISBN: 978-3-030-65367-5

  • Online ISBN: 978-3-030-65368-2

  • eBook Packages: EducationEducation (R0)