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The Valley as the Border, the Border as a Dangerous, Faraway Place

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Abstract

This chapter begins to tell the national story of the U.S.-Mexico border in the 2010s, in which the Rio Grande Valley of south Texas is emblematic. The chapter argues that the national media and political actors discursively treat the Rio Grande Valley most often as an internal colony, effectively rebordering the Valley as the Global South. National renderings of the southern border draw from a deep history of place-making rhetorical techniques to characterize the southern border in need of external intervention and control. The chapter’s analysis is placed within research in border rhetorics, bordering, and place-making. Secondary data on unauthorized immigration and asylum seekers as well as public corruption challenge framing assumptions and generalizations. The media and political treatment of the Valley in the 2010s continues a long history of using “the border” as a rhetorical pawn that set the stage for the rise of Donald Trump and his political platform.

Keywords

Global South Internal colony Corruption U.S.-Mexico border Donald Trump 

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© The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2021

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of AnthropologyThe University of Texas at San AntonioSan AntonioUSA

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