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Toward a Feminist Information Architecture

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Part of the Human–Computer Interaction Series book series (HCIS)

Abstract

The need to focus on feminism in information architecture; the importance of defining “the user”; defining feminism in social and academic contexts; feminist studies and practices within information architecture and related disciplines such as HCI, information science, and interaction design; a feminist agenda for information architecture.

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  • DOI: 10.1007/978-3-030-63205-2_21
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Notes

  1. 1.

    For instance, in discussions with Karl Fast in March 2017 and Jeff Pass in June 2018.

  2. 2.

    See also “Classical to Contemporary” in this same volume.

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Correspondence to Stacy Merrill Surla .

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Surla, S.M. (2021). Toward a Feminist Information Architecture. In: Resmini, A., Rice, S.A., Irizarry, B. (eds) Advances in Information Architecture. Human–Computer Interaction Series. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-63205-2_21

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-63205-2_21

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