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Conclusion

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The Italian Literature of the Axis War

Part of the book series: Italian and Italian American Studies ((IIAS))

Abstract

The conclusion summarises some of the main findings of this book, highlighting how the study of the figures of repetition in cultural production can support the exploration of cultural products in connection with collective memory. Bartolini reflects on the general shortcomings that affected Italian culture, which failed to develop a sense of responsibility for the past. At the end, he lists possible new directions for the study of the memory of World War II through the exploration of cultural products, both within Italian Studies and in a comparative transnational perspective.

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Notes

  1. 1.

    Both Claudio Pavone and Ruth Ben-Ghiat have stressed that this would have been a particularly beneficial perspective for Italy’s memory culture. See Pavone, ‘Introduction’, Journal of Modern Italian Studies, 9.3 (2004), 271–279 (p. 277); Ben-Ghiat, ‘Unmaking the Fascist Man: Masculinity, Film, and the Transition from Dictatorship’, Journal of Modern Italian Studies, 10.3 (2005), 336–365 (p. 347).

  2. 2.

    On the effects that the absence of these trials had on Italian culture, see Michele Battini, ‘Sins of Memory: Reflections on the Lack of an Italian Nuremberg and the Administration of International Justice after 1945’, Journal of Modern Italian Studies, 9.3 (2004), 349–362.

  3. 3.

    On Salvatores’ film, see Saverio Giovacchini, ‘Soccer with the Dead: Mediterraneo, the Legacy of Neorealismo, and the Myth of Italiani brava gente’, in Michael Paris, ed., Repicturing the Second World War: Representations in Film and Television (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2007), pp. 55–69.

  4. 4.

    There are promising signs of such development. See, for instance, Antonio Pennacchi, Canale Mussolini (Milan: Mondadori, 2010), p. 356.

  5. 5.

    Not only is this confirmed by the international reception of a movie such as Mediterraneo, but also by Louis de Bernières’ best-selling book Captain Corelli’s Mandolin (1993), which was transposed into a film by John Madden in 2001.

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Bartolini, G. (2021). Conclusion. In: The Italian Literature of the Axis War. Italian and Italian American Studies. Palgrave Macmillan, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-63181-9_7

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-63181-9_7

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  • Publisher Name: Palgrave Macmillan, Cham

  • Print ISBN: 978-3-030-63180-2

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