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Artificial Intelligence And Digital Forensics

Part of the International Series on Computer Entertainment and Media Technology book series (ISCEMT)

Abstract

Artificial intelligence (AI) is a well-established branch of computer science concerned with making machines smart enough to perform computationally large or complex tasks that normally require human intelligence; furthermore, it comprises a combination of technologies that can obtain insights and patterns from a massive amount of data which is a crucial element of forensic analysis. This chapter focuses on AI and its subfields: machine learning and deep learning—in general—and also details AI and data mining techniques pertaining to digital forensics. In highlighting the current shortcomings of prevailing approaches, we propose a new approach to offer a clearer insight into potential data, and/or detect variables of interest, as well as assess the future of digital forensics in the concluding section.

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  • DOI: 10.1007/978-3-030-61675-5_11
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Iqbal, F., Debbabi, M., Fung, B.C.M. (2020). Artificial Intelligence And Digital Forensics. In: Machine Learning for Authorship Attribution and Cyber Forensics. International Series on Computer Entertainment and Media Technology. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-61675-5_11

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