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Learning Behavioral Representations from Wearable Sensors

Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNISA,volume 12268)

Abstract

Continuous collection of physiological data from wearable sensors enables temporal characterization of individual behaviors. Understanding the relation between an individual’s behavioral patterns and psychological states can help identify strategies to improve quality of life. One challenge in analyzing physiological data is extracting the underlying behavioral states from the temporal sensor signals and interpreting them. Here, we use a non-parametric Bayesian approach to model sensor data from multiple people and discover the dynamic behaviors they share. We apply this method to data collected from sensors worn by a population of hospital workers and show that the learned states can cluster participants into meaningful groups and better predict their cognitive and psychological states. This method offers a way to learn interpretable compact behavioral representations from multivariate sensor signals.

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Acknowledgements

The research was supported by the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI), Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA), via IARPA Contract No 2017-17042800005.

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Correspondence to Nazgol Tavabi .

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Tavabi, N. et al. (2020). Learning Behavioral Representations from Wearable Sensors. In: Thomson, R., Bisgin, H., Dancy, C., Hyder, A., Hussain, M. (eds) Social, Cultural, and Behavioral Modeling. SBP-BRiMS 2020. Lecture Notes in Computer Science(), vol 12268. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-61255-9_24

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-61255-9_24

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