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Review of International Standards and Policy Guidelines for Smart Sustainable Cities

Part of the Public Administration and Information Technology book series (PAIT,volume 37)

Abstract

Smart cities are often criticized for preoccupation with technology, for ignoring the negative effects of technology, for irrelevance to the needs of the poor, and for ubiquitous data collection creating perfect conditions for surveillance societies and autocratic states. In response, cities pursue smartness and sustainability simultaneously, becoming global (by participation in global digital networks) and local (by addressing local needs and circumstances) at the same time. In the pursuit of smart sustainable cities, they make explicit policy decisions about how technology should serve their residents, businesses and visitors, and avoid disrupting them. Many decisions are about standards—which standards should be followed and how, and increasingly, standards and policy guidelines are adopted by cities from international organizations, circumventing national authorities. This chapter reviews international standards and policy guidelines published by international standards organizations or intergovernmental bodies, with stated goals to support member states in the development and management of smart sustainable cities. We conducted the review through exploratory research and comparative policy analysis. The result could be used to raise awareness and address knowledge needs among city managers, policy analysts, and smart city researchers.

Keywords

  • Smart cities
  • Smart sustainable cities
  • International standards
  • International policy guidelines

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  • DOI: 10.1007/978-3-030-61033-3_4
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Fig. 1

Notes

  1. 1.

    ISO, https://www.iso.org/home.html, last visited 2020-02-01.

  2. 2.

    ITU, https://www.itu.int/en/Pages/default.aspx, last visited 2020-02-01.

  3. 3.

    EC, https://ec.europa.eu/, last visited 2020-02-01.

  4. 4.

    UNESCWA, https://www.unescwa.org/, last visited 2020-02-01.

  5. 5.

    BRICS Countries—Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa, http://infobrics.org/, last visited 2020-02-01.

  6. 6.

    “A biophilic city is more than simply a biodiverse city. It is a place that learns from nature and emulates natural systems, incorporates natural forms and images into its buildings and cityscapes, and designs and plans in conjunction with nature. A biophilic city cherishes the natural features that already exist but also works to restore and repair what has been lost or degraded”, from “Biophilic Cities”, by Timothy Beatly, ISBN: 9781597267144, https://islandpress.org/books/biophilic-cities, last visited 2020-02-01.

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Correspondence to Elsa Estevez .

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Estevez, E., Cenci, K., Fillottrani, P., Janowski, T. (2021). Review of International Standards and Policy Guidelines for Smart Sustainable Cities. In: Estevez, E., Pardo, T.A., Scholl, H.J. (eds) Smart Cities and Smart Governance. Public Administration and Information Technology, vol 37. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-61033-3_4

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