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Information on Colon Polyps in Terms of Gastroenterology

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Colon Polyps and Colorectal Cancer

Abstract

Mucosal formations that protrude toward the lumen in the gastrointestinal tract are called polyps. According to microscopic details, they differ from each other.

Adenomatoid polyps are benign neoplastic epithelial tumors. They make up about two-thirds of all colon polyps. Adenomas are often asymptomatic. They are usually detected incidentally in the examinations during unexplained iron deficiency anemia or colorectal cancer scans.

If there is a polyp in the colon, the probability of the existence of synchronous polyps in the remaining colon should be considered.

Although the growth rate of each adenoma is variable, usually small polyps grow by an average of 0.5 mm per year. Over 7–10 years only a small portion of adenoma advances to cancer. In advanced adenomas (high-degree dysplasia, >10 mm size, or villus component content), the risk is higher.

The neoplastic nature can be determined by the histological detection of glandular structures of adenomas. All adenomatous polyps in the colon are dysplastic.

Little is known about the natural course of adenomatous polyps left untreated. But if a polyp is detected in the colon, it must be removed. Today we have new endoscopic technics for removing the polyps.

In this section, polyp definition, types, treatment of polyps, and follow-up strategies are described.

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Hakim, G.D. (2021). Information on Colon Polyps in Terms of Gastroenterology. In: Engin, O. (eds) Colon Polyps and Colorectal Cancer. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-57273-0_6

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