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Intimate Partner Violence in the Military

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Abstract

Military personnel can be subject to extreme work-related stress. Unlike many other stressful jobs, those in the military may experience endangerment of themselves and their friends or loved ones. This can lead to mental illness such as anxiety, depression, and PTSD. Do these extreme circumstances influence intimate partner violence perpetration and/or victimization?

Keywords

  • Military
  • Intimate partner violence
  • Veterans
  • Veteran’s affairs
  • PTSD
  • Firearms

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Correspondence to Roger A. Mitchell .

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Mitchell, R.A. (2021). Intimate Partner Violence in the Military. In: Bailey, R.K. (eds) Intimate Partner Violence. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-55864-2_9

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-55864-2_9

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  • Publisher Name: Springer, Cham

  • Print ISBN: 978-3-030-55863-5

  • Online ISBN: 978-3-030-55864-2

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