Skip to main content

STeMA: A Sustainable Territorial Economic/Environmental Management Approach

  • 112 Accesses

Part of the Advances in Spatial Science book series (ADVSPATIAL)

Abstract

The STeMA-TIA model has been devised to support an integrated strategic vision of general, territorialised and sectoral policies at all decision-making levels. This assessment tool was created within the context of spatial planning and as part of the territorial dimension of the European Strategies. STeMA-TIA is based on an original qualitative-quantitative methodological approach comprising 10 simplifying hypotheses and 9 logical steps. It develops along interactive coaxial matrices (indicators-policies-effects), which return ex ante and ex post results and maps. It was fruitfully applied to the Territorial Dimension within the Lisbon/Gothenburg Strategy, the Territorial Cohesion Policy, and National and Regional Operative Plans 2020, as well as to Italian structural reforms at the metropolitan and regional level. The strength of this tool lies in its flexibility and ability to combine different indicators related to economic, social, environmental, cultural, organisational and financial dimensions, which assess Territorial Impact Assessment in relation to original Systemic Territorial Functional Typologies. One existing weakness of STeMA-TIA is that, during a pairwise comparison process, identifying indicators such as ‘dominant’ and ‘secondary’ may not always be straightforward. Further developments and applications may help overcome this limitation. Future applications of STeMA-TIA include using it to measure Territorial Cohesion within green economy policies at the national-regional level or to evaluate the post-2020 Europe strategy, cultural heritage and tourist strategies via Innovative Technologies and within Smart Specialisation Strategy.

Keywords

  • Territorial impact assessment
  • STeMA
  • European sustainable policies

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

Buying options

Chapter
USD   29.95
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • DOI: 10.1007/978-3-030-54502-4_4
  • Chapter length: 22 pages
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
  • Exclusive offer for individuals only
  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
eBook
USD   89.00
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • ISBN: 978-3-030-54502-4
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
  • Exclusive offer for individuals only
  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
Softcover Book
USD   119.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
Hardcover Book
USD   119.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
Fig. 4.1
Fig. 4.2
Fig. 4.3
Fig. 4.4
Fig. 4.5

Notes

  1. 1.

    STeMA-TIA is a copyrighted tool owned by Maria Prezioso © (all rights reserved); copyright no. 0602007/2006.

  2. 2.

    Indicators are seen as messengers/receptors of the impact at different policy levels.

  3. 3.

    Drawing on the AHP technique, each level is determined by three weighting criteria: absolute, distributive and ideal mode (Saaty and Vargas 1993).

  4. 4.

    WIx refers to the weight of the indicator I, which depends on the position or capacity of I to apply a given policy and its contents, as per its determinant D (e.g. smart growth in the Europe 2020 Strategy). During policy assessment, the weight can show how important the objectives and actions must be in order to reach a given target. The Impact can also be defined according to its intrinsic and specific weight.

  5. 5.

    The quality of each indicator refers to its initial state, which can be incremented due to the impact of a policy during a TIA process.

  6. 6.

    In order to make them verifiable, all values have been normalised according to a 0–1 scale, which makes quantitative weighting possible.

  7. 7.

    Also known as the capacity of a system to maintain/reacquire balanced positions.

  8. 8.

    The term ‘impact’ here is used to describe the moment a given aspect is modified, due to the contact between an indicator/receptor and a policy action.

  9. 9.

    The impact level that a policy action has in the attempt to reach set targets.

  10. 10.

    Cf. for instance 3, 2, 1 and 0 in the Lisbon/Gothenburg Strategy evaluation.

  11. 11.

    The matrix correlation for weight, effect and indicator/receptor will return values that can range from ‘absolute’ (A) to ‘absent’ (‘nil’); they can be easily detected in the STeMA-TIA GIS and in its mapping process.

  12. 12.

    The application of STeMA-TIA can be found in projects such as: the CADSES project POLY.DEV (Italy, Slovenia, Slovakia, Bulgaria and Greece) (Prezioso 2007); the NewCiMed project under the ENPI CBC Med Programme (Italy, Spain, Greece, Tunisia, Jordan and Lebanon); Observation and Territorial activities of the Centre of Excellence–Technological District of Cultural Heritage of the Lazio Region; the planning activities across the metropolitan city of Rome; the green economy development (Prezioso et al. 2016); the spending review of Italian regions (Prezioso 2019); the relation with the Maritime Spatial Planning (D’Orazio and Prezioso, 2017).

References

  • Adkins WG, Burke D Jr (1971) Social, economic and environmental factors in highway decision making. Texas Highway Dep., Dallas

    Google Scholar 

  • Bereano A (1972) A proposed methodology for assessing alternative technologies. Cornell University, New York

    Google Scholar 

  • D’Orazio A, Prezioso M (2017) Surfing multiple dimensions: an integrated approach in maritime spatial planning. In: Kitsiou D, Karydis M (eds) Marine spatial planning: methodologies, environmental issues and current trends. Nova Science Publishing, New York, pp 115–154

    Google Scholar 

  • Duke KM et al (1977) Environmental quality assessment in multi-objective planning. Battelle-Columbus Laboratories, Columbus

    Google Scholar 

  • Falque M (1975) Pur une planification écologique, Falque Max, Paris

    Google Scholar 

  • Georgescu-Roegen N (1971) The entropy law and the economic process. Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA

    Google Scholar 

  • Georgescu-Roegen N (1977) Bioeconomics: a new look at the nature of the economic activity. In: Junker L (ed) The political economy of food and energy. University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, pp 105–134

    Google Scholar 

  • Leopold LB et al (1971) A procedure for evaluating environmental impact, Geological Survey, Circ. N. 645, Leopold Luna Bergere, Washington, DC

    Google Scholar 

  • Malcevschi S (1986) Indicatori eterogenei e bilanci di impatto ambizntale. Elementi per un paradigma di collegamento. In: Schmidt di Friedberg P (a cura di) Gli indicatori ambientali: valori, metri e strumenti nello studio dell'impatto ambientale. FrancoAngeli, Milano, pp 883–914

    Google Scholar 

  • Mandelbrot BB (1975) Les objets fractals: forme, hasard et dimension. Flammarion, Paris

    Google Scholar 

  • Mueller JH (1970) Statistical reasoning in sociology. Houghton Mifflin, Boston

    Google Scholar 

  • Prezioso M (1990) Gli indicatori socioeconomici nella ricerca geografica applicata. Prime considerazioni di stima e reperimento delle fonti. Geografia nelle Scuole 4:327–335

    Google Scholar 

  • Prezioso M (1995) La base geoeconomica della Valutazione di Impatto Ambientale. Pacini, Ospedaletto

    Google Scholar 

  • Prezioso M (ed) (2006) Territorial dimension of the Lisbon-Gothenburg process. Aracne, Rome. http://www.espon.eu/main/Menu_Projects/Menu_ESPON2006Projects/Menu_CoordinatingCrossThematicProjects/lisbonstrategy.html. Last accessed: July 2019

    Google Scholar 

  • Prezioso M (2007) Model application remarks. In: Quaglia T (ed) Common best practices in spatial planning for the promotion of sustainable POLYcentric DEVelopment. Regione Veneto, Venezia, pp 57–59

    Google Scholar 

  • Prezioso M (2008) Cohesion policy: methodology and indicators towards common approach. Rom J Reg Sci 2:1–32

    Google Scholar 

  • Prezioso M (2010) The sustainable territorial environmental/economic management approach to manage global policy impacts and effects. In: Cancilla R, Garganos M (eds) Global environmental policies: impact, management and effects. Nova Science Publisher, Hauppauge, pp 110–163

    Google Scholar 

  • Prezioso M (ed) (2011a) Competitiveness in sustainability: the territorial dimension in the implementation of Lisbon/Gothenburg processes in Italian regions and provinces. Pàtron, Bologna, pp 19–36

    Google Scholar 

  • Prezioso M (2011b) STeMA: proposal for scientific approach and methodology to TIA of policy. In: Farinos Dasi J (ed) De la Valuacion Ambiental Estrategica a la Evalucion de Impacto Territorial, Generalitat Valenciana/PUV. Valencia Autonomus Region Government/University of Valencia Publications Office, Valencia, pp 100–130

    Google Scholar 

  • Prezioso M (ed) (2018) Quale territorial impact assessment della coesione territoriale nelle regioni italiane. La concettualizzazione del problema. Pàtron, Bologna

    Google Scholar 

  • Prezioso, M (2019a) Methodological approach for a new economic geography of the territorial cohesion in Europe and Italy. Bollettino della Società Geografica Italiana serie 14 (2 Special Issue): 7–24

    Google Scholar 

  • Prezioso M (2019b) Measuring the progress towards Territorial Cohesion: a TIA application to the regional development programs. In: ESPON 2020 Scientific Conference, Building the next generation of research on territorial development, London 14 Nov. 2018, ESPON, Luxembourg, pp 49–53

    Google Scholar 

  • Prezioso M, Ottaviani V (2009) New Methodological rules in order to measure the sustainable territorial development. In: PISTA 2009: politics and information systems, technologies and applications, Orlando, Florida, July 10th – 13th

    Google Scholar 

  • Prezioso M, Coronato M, D’Orazio A (2016) Green Economy e capitale territoriale. Dalla ricerca geografico economica, proposta di metodi, indicatori, strumenti. Patron, Bologna

    Google Scholar 

  • Roy B (1996) Multicriteria methodology for decision aiding. Kluwer Academic Pub, Dordrecht

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Saaty TL (1977) A scaling method for priorities in hierarchical structures. J Math Psycol 15:234–281

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Saaty TL (1980) The analytic hierarchy process. McGraw-Hill, New York

    Google Scholar 

  • Saaty TL (1990) How to make a decision: the analytic hierarchy process. Eur J Oper Res 48(1):9–26

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Saaty TL, Kearns KP (1985) Analytical planning. Pergamon Press, Oxford

    Google Scholar 

  • Saaty TL, Vargas LG, Wendell RE (1983) Assessing attribute weights by ratios. Omega 11(1):9–13

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Saaty TL, Vargas LG (1993) Experiments on rank preservation and reversal in relative measurement. Mathematical and Computer Modelling, Volume 17, Issues 4–5, pp. 13–18.

    Google Scholar 

  • Vernasdky WI (1945) The biosphere and the noosphere. Am Sci 33:1–12

    Google Scholar 

  • Von Bertalanffy L (1969) General system theory. G. Braziller, New York

    Google Scholar 

  • Warner ML, Preston EH (1974) A review of environmental impact assessment methodology. US Government Printing Office, Washington, DC. EPA 600/5-74-002

    Google Scholar 

Download references

Author information

Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Maria Prezioso .

Editor information

Editors and Affiliations

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

Copyright information

© 2020 Springer Nature Switzerland AG

About this chapter

Verify currency and authenticity via CrossMark

Cite this chapter

Prezioso, M. (2020). STeMA: A Sustainable Territorial Economic/Environmental Management Approach. In: Medeiros, E. (eds) Territorial Impact Assessment . Advances in Spatial Science. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-54502-4_4

Download citation